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Migration and innovation: A survey

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  • Rashidi, Sheida
  • Pyka, Andreas

Abstract

In a world characterized by competition on a global scale, persistent structural change driven by innovation and aging societies in industrialized economies, also the competition for the best talents on the labour markets becomes global and more intensive. Therefore it is not surprising that old-fashioned brain drain explanations for migration are no longer convincing. In the knowledge-based economies of the 21st centuries the ideas of brain circulation and international (diaspora) innovation networks become prevailing and should guide the design of migration policies. This paper is a survey on the theoretical and empirical approaches which address the important relationship between migration and innovation.

Suggested Citation

  • Rashidi, Sheida & Pyka, Andreas, 2013. "Migration and innovation: A survey," FZID Discussion Papers 77-2013, University of Hohenheim, Center for Research on Innovation and Services (FZID).
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:fziddp:772013
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    7. Andries de Grip & Didier Fouarge & Jan Sauermann, 2010. "What affects international migration of European science and engineering graduates?," Economics of Innovation and New Technology, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 19(5), pages 407-421.
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    Cited by:

    1. Mehdi Chowdhury & Arijit Mukherjee, 2016. "Labour Market Integration and Innovation: The Implications on Consumers," Manchester School, University of Manchester, vol. 84(6), pages 771-794, December.
    2. Marcus H. Böhme & Sarah Kups, 2017. "The economic effects of labour immigration in developing countries: A literature review," OECD Development Centre Working Papers 335, OECD Publishing.

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    Keywords

    Innovation; Migration;

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