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The pecuniary and non-pecuniary returns to voucher-financed training

Author

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  • Görlitz, Katja
  • Tamm, Marcus

Abstract

This paper analyzes the returns to training that was co-financed by the German voucher program Bildungsprämie. The estimation strategy compares outcomes of participants in voucher training with voucher recipients who intended to participate in training, but did not do so because of a random event like course cancellation by the provider of training. We find no impact of voucher training on wages, employment, job tasks and on subjective outcomes (in particular, the risk of job loss and job satisfaction). However, there is evidence that training participants report to better match the skill requirements of their job.

Suggested Citation

  • Görlitz, Katja & Tamm, Marcus, 2015. "The pecuniary and non-pecuniary returns to voucher-financed training," Discussion Papers 2015/11, Free University Berlin, School of Business & Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:fubsbe:201511
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    4. Schwerdt, Guido & Messer, Dolores & Woessmann, Ludger & Wolter, Stefan C., 2012. "The impact of an adult education voucher program: Evidence from a randomized field experiment," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 96(7-8), pages 569-583.
    5. Anna Cristina D'Addio & Tor Eriksson & Paul Frijters, 2007. "An analysis of the determinants of job satisfaction when individuals' baseline satisfaction levels may differ," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 39(19), pages 2413-2423.
    6. Harley Frazis & Mark A. Loewenstein, 2005. "Reexamining the Returns to Training: Functional Form, Magnitude, and Interpretation," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 40(2).
    7. Claudia Burgard & Katja Görlitz, 2014. "Continuous training, job satisfaction and gender: An empirical analysis using German panel data," Evidence-based HRM: A Global Forum for Empirical Scholarship, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 2(2), pages 126-144, October.
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    14. Singer, Christine & Toomet, Ott-Siim, 2013. "On government-subsidized training programs for older workers," IAB Discussion Paper 201321, Institut für Arbeitsmarkt- und Berufsforschung (IAB), Nürnberg [Institute for Employment Research, Nuremberg, Germany].
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    training; vouchers; returns to training; program evaluation;

    JEL classification:

    • I22 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Educational Finance; Financial Aid
    • I26 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Returns to Education
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • M53 - Business Administration and Business Economics; Marketing; Accounting; Personnel Economics - - Personnel Economics - - - Training

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