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Sex matters: Gender differences in a professional setting

  • Niessen, Alexandra
  • Ruenzi, Stefan

This paper shows that gender di®erences exist in a professional setting where man-agers have a similar educational background and work experience. Using data from the U.S. mutual fund industry we find that female managers are more risk averse, follow less extreme and more consistent investment styles and trade less than male managers. Although female and male managers do not differ in average performance, female man-agers receive significantly lower inflows. This suggests that they might be stereotyped as less skilled. Furthermore, they mainly work in companies that are large, well established and that are located in less conservative states of the U.S.

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File URL: http://econstor.eu/bitstream/10419/57738/1/700623612.pdf
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Paper provided by University of Cologne, Centre for Financial Research (CFR) in its series CFR Working Papers with number 06-01.

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Date of creation: 2007
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Handle: RePEc:zbw:cfrwps:0601
Contact details of provider: Postal: 0221 / 470 5607
Phone: 0221 / 470 5607
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Web page: http://cfr-cologne.de/english/version06/html/home.php
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  1. Renate Schubert, 1999. "Financial Decision-Making: Are Women Really More Risk-Averse?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 89(2), pages 381-385, May.
  2. Bram Cadsby, C. & Maynes, Elizabeth, 2005. "Gender, risk aversion, and the drawing power of equilibrium in an experimental corporate takeover game," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 56(1), pages 39-59, January.
  3. Dora L. Costa & Matthew E. Kahn, 2008. "Learning from the Past," NBER Chapters, in: Heroes and Cowards: The Social Face of War National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. Gina Nicolosi & Liang Peng & Ning Zhu, 2003. "Do Individual Investors Learn from Their Trading Experience?," Yale School of Management Working Papers ysm439, Yale School of Management, revised 01 Sep 2009.
  5. Daniel Dorn & Gur Huberman, 2005. "Talk and Action: What Individual Investors Say and What They Do," Review of Finance, Springer, vol. 9(4), pages 437-481, December.
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