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Gender differences in competitive positions: Experimental evidence on job promotion

Listed author(s):
  • Peterlé, Emmanuel
  • Rau, Holger A.

This paper analyzes gender differences in access to competitive positions. We implement an experiment where workers can apply for a job promotion by sending a signal to their employer. We control for gender differences in anticipation of discrimination in a treatment where a computer randomly recruits. Discriminatory behavior by the employer is isolated in a treatment where workers cannot send signals. We find that gender disparity among promoted workers is highest when workers can apply for promotion and employers recruit. Strikingly, the gender composition in competitive position is balanced in the absence of a signaling institution. When signaling is possible, we observe that female workers who do not request a promotion are discriminated against.

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File URL: https://www.econstor.eu/bitstream/10419/150044/1/88029633X.pdf
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Paper provided by University of Goettingen, Department of Economics in its series Center for European, Governance and Economic Development Research Discussion Papers with number 303.

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Date of creation: 2017
Handle: RePEc:zbw:cegedp:303
Contact details of provider: Postal:
Platz der Göttinger Sieben 3, 37073 Göttingen

Web page: http://www.cege.wiso.uni-goettingen.de/

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