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Improving Tatonnement Methods for Solving Heterogeneous Agent Models

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  • Ludwig, Alexander

    () (Mannheim Research Institute for the Economics of Aging (MEA) and Sonderforschungsbereich 504)

Abstract

This paper modifies standard block Gauss-Seidel iterations used by tatonnement methods for solving large scale deterministic heterogeneous agent models. The composite method between first- and second-order tatonnement methods is shown to considerably improve convergence both in terms of speed as well as robustness relative to conventional first-order tatonnement methods. In addition, the relative advantage of the modified algorithm increases in the size and complexity of the economic model. Therefore, the algorithm allows significant reductions in computational time when solving large models. The algorithm is particularly attractive since it is easy to implement - it only augments conventional and intuitive tatonnement iterations with standard numerical methods.

Suggested Citation

  • Ludwig, Alexander, 2004. "Improving Tatonnement Methods for Solving Heterogeneous Agent Models," Sonderforschungsbereich 504 Publications 04-29, Sonderforschungsbereich 504, Universität Mannheim;Sonderforschungsbereich 504, University of Mannheim.
  • Handle: RePEc:xrs:sfbmaa:04-29
    Note: I thank Alan Auerbach, Axel Börsch-Supan,
    as

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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Axel Börsch-Supan & Alexander Ludwig & Joachim Winter, 2006. "Ageing, Pension Reform and Capital Flows: A Multi-Country Simulation Model," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 73(292), pages 625-658, November.
    2. David Domeij & Martin Flodén, 2006. "Population Aging And International Capital Flows," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 47(3), pages 1013-1032, August.
    3. Fair, Ray C & Taylor, John B, 1983. "Solution and Maximum Likelihood Estimation of Dynamic Nonlinear Rational Expectations Models," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 51(4), pages 1169-1185, July.
    4. repec:adr:anecst:y:1990:i:17 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Judd, Kenneth L., 2002. "The parametric path method: an alternative to Fair-Taylor and L-B-J for solving perfect foresight models," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 26(9-10), pages 1557-1583, August.
    6. Juillard, Michel & Laxton, Douglas & McAdam, Peter & Pioro, Hope, 1998. "An algorithm competition: First-order iterations versus Newton-based techniques," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 22(8-9), pages 1291-1318, August.
    7. David Altig, 2001. "Simulating Fundamental Tax Reform in the United States," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 91(3), pages 574-595, June.
    8. repec:adr:anecst:y:1990:i:17:p:04 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Boucekkine, Raouf, 1995. "An alternative methodology for solving nonlinear forward-looking models," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 19(4), pages 711-734, May.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Axel Börsch-Supan & Alexander Ludwig & Joachim Winter, 2006. "Ageing, Pension Reform and Capital Flows: A Multi-Country Simulation Model," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 73(292), pages 625-658, November.
    2. Axel Börsch-Supan & Alexander Ludwig, 2010. "Old Europe Ages: Reforms and Reform Backlashes," NBER Chapters,in: Demography and the Economy, pages 169-204 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Alexander Ludwig, 2005. "Moment estimation in Auerbach-Kotlikoff models: How well do they match the data?," MEA discussion paper series 05093, Munich Center for the Economics of Aging (MEA) at the Max Planck Institute for Social Law and Social Policy.
    4. Alexander Ludwig, 2005. "Aging and Economic Growth: The Role of Factor Markets and of Fundamental Pension Reforms," MEA discussion paper series 05094, Munich Center for the Economics of Aging (MEA) at the Max Planck Institute for Social Law and Social Policy.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • E13 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - General Aggregative Models - - - Neoclassical
    • C63 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Mathematical Methods; Programming Models; Mathematical and Simulation Modeling - - - Computational Techniques
    • C68 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Mathematical Methods; Programming Models; Mathematical and Simulation Modeling - - - Computable General Equilibrium Models

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