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Is Central Paris still that rich?

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  • Frederic Gilli

    (CERAS ENPC)

Abstract

From 1975 to 1999, employment in Paris metropolitan area has become more and more decentralized. This deconcentration is almost half spread and half clustered. Parallel to the sprawl of jobs, the growth of a services oriented economy has led to an increase in sectoral concentration. But there are no clear evidences of a vertical spatial desintegration, because by the same time the places tend to diversify. An explanation might be that the sprawl relies both on endogenous job creations and on job relocations: the relocations tend to increase the specialisation of the clusters but endogenous growth is more diverse and residential.

Suggested Citation

  • Frederic Gilli, 2005. "Is Central Paris still that rich?," Urban/Regional 0507001, EconWPA.
  • Handle: RePEc:wpa:wuwpur:0507001
    Note: Type of Document - pdf; pages: 28
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    File URL: https://econwpa.ub.uni-muenchen.de/econ-wp/urb/papers/0507/0507001.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • L23 - Industrial Organization - - Firm Objectives, Organization, and Behavior - - - Organization of Production
    • O18 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Urban, Rural, Regional, and Transportation Analysis; Housing; Infrastructure
    • R11 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Regional Economic Activity: Growth, Development, Environmental Issues, and Changes
    • R12 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Size and Spatial Distributions of Regional Economic Activity; Interregional Trade (economic geography)

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