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Is Central Paris still that rich?

  • Frederic Gilli

    (CERAS ENPC)

From 1975 to 1999, employment in Paris metropolitan area has become more and more decentralized. This deconcentration is almost half spread and half clustered. Parallel to the sprawl of jobs, the growth of a services oriented economy has led to an increase in sectoral concentration. But there are no clear evidences of a vertical spatial desintegration, because by the same time the places tend to diversify. An explanation might be that the sprawl relies both on endogenous job creations and on job relocations: the relocations tend to increase the specialisation of the clusters but endogenous growth is more diverse and residential.

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File URL: http://econwpa.repec.org/eps/urb/papers/0507/0507001.pdf
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Paper provided by EconWPA in its series Urban/Regional with number 0507001.

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Length: 28 pages
Date of creation: 08 Jul 2005
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:wpa:wuwpur:0507001
Note: Type of Document - pdf; pages: 28
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://econwpa.repec.org

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  8. Fujita, M. & Thisse, J.-F., . "Economics of agglomeration," CORE Discussion Papers RP -1250, Université catholique de Louvain, Center for Operations Research and Econometrics (CORE).
  9. McMillen, Daniel P. & McDonald, John F., 1998. "Suburban Subcenters and Employment Density in Metropolitan Chicago," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 43(2), pages 157-180, March.
  10. Giuliano, Genevieve & Small, Kenneth A., 1991. "Subcenters in the Los Angeles region," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 21(2), pages 163-182, July.
  11. Anderson, John E., 1982. "Cubic-spline urban-density functions," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 12(2), pages 155-167, September.
  12. Raymond Bénard & Hubert Jayet & Dominique Rajaonarison, 1999. "L'environnement souhaité par les entreprises. une enquête dans le Nord-Pas-de-Calais," Économie et Statistique, Programme National Persée, vol. 326(1), pages 177-187.
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