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The Optimal Design of a Market

  • Sandro Brusco

    (Universidad Carlos III Madrid)

  • Matthew O. Jackson

    (California Institute of Technology)

We study the optimal design of the rules of trade in a two-period market given that agents arrive at different times and may only trade with agents present contemporaneously. First period agents face a fixed cost of trading across periods, and their decisions of whether or not to trade in the second period result in externalities relative to the agents arriving in the second period. Given the non-convexities associated with the fixed cost, competitive trading rules can result in inefficiencies in such a market and, in fact, anonymity must be sacrificed to achieve efficiency. Efficient trading rules have a market maker (i.e., an agent who is given some market power and the right to trade across periods) who faces some competition within period trading, but not across periods. The efficient choice of who should be market maker can be made by auctioning rights to this position. If there is uncertainty across periods, then efficient mechanisms may involve multiple market makers, and the optimal number of market makers depends on the cost of trading, level of risk aversion, and presence of asymmetric information.

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Paper provided by EconWPA in its series Microeconomics with number 9711003.

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Length: 37 pages
Date of creation: 25 Nov 1997
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:wpa:wuwpmi:9711003
Note: Type of Document - postscript; prepared on pc-latex; to print on Postscript; pages: 37; figures: none. comments welcome
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://128.118.178.162

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  1. Gehrig, Thomas, 1993. "Intermediation in Search Markets," Journal of Economics & Management Strategy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 2(1), pages 97-120, Spring.
  2. Peck, James, 1990. "Liquidity without money: A General equilibrium model of market microstructure," Journal of Financial Intermediation, Elsevier, vol. 1(1), pages 80-103, March.
  3. Luis Corchón & Sandeep Baliga & Tomas Sjöström, 1995. "The Theory Of Implementation When The Planner Is A Player," Working Papers. Serie AD 1995-14, Instituto Valenciano de Investigaciones Económicas, S.A. (Ivie).
  4. Glover Jonathan, 1994. "A Simpler Mechanism That Stops Agents from Cheating," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 62(1), pages 221-229, February.
  5. Lu Hong, 1996. "Bayesian implementation in exchange economies with state dependent feasible sets and private information," Social Choice and Welfare, Springer, vol. 13(4), pages 433-444.
  6. Gehrig, Thomas & Jackson, Matthew O., 1997. "Bid-Ask Spreads with Indirect Competition among Specialists," CEPR Discussion Papers 1648, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  7. Bhaskar Dutta & Arunava Sen & Rajiv Vohra, 1994. "Nash implementation through elementary mechanisms in economic environments," Review of Economic Design, Springer, vol. 1(1), pages 173-203, December.
  8. Matthew 0. Jackson, 1989. "Implementation in Undominated Strategies - A Look at Bounded Mechanisms," Discussion Papers 833, Northwestern University, Center for Mathematical Studies in Economics and Management Science.
  9. Ananth N. Madhavan, . "Trading Mechanisms in Securities Markets," Rodney L. White Center for Financial Research Working Papers 16-90, Wharton School Rodney L. White Center for Financial Research.
  10. Pagano, Marco & Roell, Ailsa, 1996. " Transparency and Liquidity: A Comparison of Auction and Dealer Markets with Informed Trading," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 51(2), pages 579-611, June.
  11. Saijo, T. & Tatamitani, Y. & Yamato, T., 1994. "Toward Natural Implementation," ISER Discussion Paper 0340, Institute of Social and Economic Research, Osaka University.
    • Saijo, Tatsuyoshi & Tatamitani, Yoshikatsu & Yamato, Takehiko, 1996. "Toward Natural Implementation," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 37(4), pages 949-80, November.
  12. Kyle, Albert S, 1989. "Informed Speculation with Imperfect Competition," Review of Economic Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 56(3), pages 317-55, July.
  13. Moore, John & Repullo, Rafael, 1988. "Subgame Perfect Implementation," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 56(5), pages 1191-1220, September.
  14. Bernhardt, Dan & Hughson, Eric, 1996. "Discrete Pricing and the Design of Dealership Markets," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 71(1), pages 148-182, October.
  15. Matthew O. Jackson & Thomas R. Palfrey, 1997. "Efficiency and Voluntary Implementation in Markets with Repeated Pairwise Bargaining," Game Theory and Information 9711003, EconWPA.
  16. Hurwicz, L, 1979. "Outcome Functions Yielding Walrasian and Lindahl Allocations at Nash Equilibrium Points," Review of Economic Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 46(2), pages 217-25, April.
  17. Schmeidler, David, 1980. "Walrasian Analysis via Strategic Outcome Functions," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 48(7), pages 1585-93, November.
  18. Roberto Serrano & Rajiv Vohra, 1997. "Non-cooperative implementation of the core," Social Choice and Welfare, Springer, vol. 14(4), pages 513-525.
  19. Glosten, Lawrence R. & Milgrom, Paul R., 1985. "Bid, ask and transaction prices in a specialist market with heterogeneously informed traders," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 14(1), pages 71-100, March.
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