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Long-Run Economic Growth: An Interdisciplinary Approach

Author

Listed:
  • Aykut Kibritcioglu

    (Ankara Univ. & Univ. of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign)

  • Selahattin Dibooglu

    (Southern Illinois Univ. at Carbondale & Univ. of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign)

Abstract

Economic growth and development is a complicated process that falls into the domain of many disciplines in social sciences and humanities. It is natural then to study fundamental aspects of economic growth synthesizing research in relevant fields. In this short paper, we argue that this has rarely been the case in the economic growth literature. We briefly discuss past growth theories and empirics, and present a broad framework to compare and evaluate work on economic growth from an interdisciplinary perspective.

Suggested Citation

  • Aykut Kibritcioglu & Selahattin Dibooglu, 2001. "Long-Run Economic Growth: An Interdisciplinary Approach," Macroeconomics 0107004, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 04 Sep 2001.
  • Handle: RePEc:wpa:wuwpma:0107004
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    File URL: https://econwpa.ub.uni-muenchen.de/econ-wp/mac/papers/0107/0107004.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Gary S. Becker & Kevin M. Murphy & Robert Tamura, 1994. "Human Capital, Fertility, and Economic Growth," NBER Chapters,in: Human Capital: A Theoretical and Empirical Analysis with Special Reference to Education (3rd Edition), pages 323-350 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Daron Acemoglu & Simon Johnson & James A. Robinson, 2001. "The Colonial Origins of Comparative Development: An Empirical Investigation," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 91(5), pages 1369-1401, December.
    3. Robert J. Barro, 1991. "Economic Growth in a Cross Section of Countries," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 106(2), pages 407-443.
    4. Barro, Robert J, 1999. "Notes on Growth Accounting," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 4(2), pages 119-137, June.
    5. David Cass, 1964. "Optimum Economic Growth in an Aggregative Model of Capital Accumulation: A Turnpike Theorem," Cowles Foundation Discussion Papers 178, Cowles Foundation for Research in Economics, Yale University.
    6. Aron, Janine, 2000. "Growth and Institutions: A Review of the Evidence," World Bank Research Observer, World Bank Group, vol. 15(1), pages 99-135, February.
    7. Janine Aron, 1998. "Political, economic and social institutions: A review of growth evidence," CSAE Working Paper Series 1998-04, Centre for the Study of African Economies, University of Oxford.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Tjasa Redek & Uros Godnov, 2007. "The Impact of Governance Quality on Economic Growth," Management, University of Primorska, Faculty of Management Koper, vol. 2(2), pages 121-136.
    2. Lubna Hasan, 2007. "Myths and Realities of Long-run Development: A Look at Deeper Determinants," The Pakistan Development Review, Pakistan Institute of Development Economics, vol. 46(1), pages 19-44.
    3. repec:ksp:journ2:v:4:y:2017:i:3:p:343-344 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Aykut Kibrit├žioglu, 2002. "On the Smithian origins of "new" trade and growth theories," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 2(1), pages 1-15.
    5. Mete Feridun, 2005. "Impact of Monetary Policy on Economic Instability in Turkey (1983 - 2003)," Prague Economic Papers, University of Economics, Prague, vol. 2005(2), pages 171-179.
    6. repec:ksp:journ2:v:4:y:2017:i:3:p:345-351 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. repec:ebl:ecbull:v:2:y:2002:i:1:p:1-15 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Economic growth; determinants of growth; growth theories; political economy of growth;

    JEL classification:

    • O10 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - General
    • O40 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - General
    • O30 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - General
    • F43 - International Economics - - Macroeconomic Aspects of International Trade and Finance - - - Economic Growth of Open Economies

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