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The role of training and innovation in workplace performance

Author

Listed:
  • Patrick Laplagne

    (Productivity Commission)

  • Leonie Bensted

    (Productivity Commission)

Abstract

This paper uses workplace-level data from the Australian Workplace Industrial Relations Survey to examine the extent to which the use of training and/or innovation by a workplace increases the likelihood that is has higher labour productivity than its competitiors, and experiences high labour productivity growth.

Suggested Citation

  • Patrick Laplagne & Leonie Bensted, 2002. "The role of training and innovation in workplace performance," Labor and Demography 0207005, EconWPA.
  • Handle: RePEc:wpa:wuwpla:0207005
    Note: Type of Document - PDF; prepared on IBM PC; to print on HP;
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    File URL: http://econwpa.repec.org/eps/lab/papers/0207/0207005.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Lisa M. Lynch & Sandra E. Black, 1995. "Beyond the Incidence of Training: Evidence from a National Employers Survey," NBER Working Papers 5231, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Alan Barrett & Philip J. O'Connell, 2001. "Does Training Generally Work? The Returns to in-Company Training," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 54(3), pages 647-662, April.
    3. Theo S. Eicher, 1996. "Interaction Between Endogenous Human Capital and Technological Change," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 63(1), pages 127-144.
    4. Machin, Steve & Van Reenen, John, 1996. "Technology and Changes in Skill Structure: Evidence from an International Panel of Industries," CEPR Discussion Papers 1434, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    5. Eli Bekman & John Bound & Stephen Machin, 1998. "Implications of Skill-Biased Technological Change: International Evidence," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 113(4), pages 1245-1279.
    6. Natalia Nunes & Geoffrey Crockett & Peter Dawkins, 1993. "The Impact of Competition and Trade Unions on Workplace Reform and Organisational and Technological Change," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 26(2), pages 71-88.
    7. Sandra E. Black & Lisa M. Lynch, 2001. "How To Compete: The Impact Of Workplace Practices And Information Technology On Productivity," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 83(3), pages 434-445, August.
    8. Black, Sandra E & Lynch, Lisa M, 1996. "Human-Capital Investments and Productivity," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 86(2), pages 263-267, May.
    9. Hellerstein, Judith K & Neumark, David & Troske, Kenneth R, 1999. "Wages, Productivity, and Worker Characteristics: Evidence from Plant-Level Production Functions and Wage Equations," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 17(3), pages 409-446, July.
    10. Forsund, Finn R. & Lovell, C. A. Knox & Schmidt, Peter, 1980. "A survey of frontier production functions and of their relationship to efficiency measurement," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 13(1), pages 5-25, May.
    11. Anne Hawke & Mark Wooden, 1997. "The 1995 Australian Workplace Industrial Relations Survey," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 30(3), pages 323-328.
    12. Battese, George E., 1991. "Frontier Production Functions and Technical Efficiency: A Survey of Empirical Applications in Agricultural Economics," 1991 Conference (35th), February 11-14, 1991, Armidale, Australia 145845, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society.
    13. Haskel, Jonathan & Heden, Ylva, 1999. "Computers and the Demand for Skilled Labour: Industry- and Establishment-Level Panel Evidence for the UK," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 109(454), pages 68-79, March.
    14. Booth, Alison L & Frank, Jeff, 1999. "Earnings, Productivity, and Performance-Related Pay," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 17(3), pages 447-463, July.
    15. Bartel, Ann P & Lichtenberg, Frank R, 1987. "The Comparative Advantage of Educated Workers in Implementing New Technology," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 69(1), pages 1-11, February.
    16. Battese, George E., 1992. "Frontier production functions and technical efficiency: a survey of empirical applications in agricultural economics," Agricultural Economics, Blackwell, vol. 7(3-4), pages 185-208, October.
    17. L. R. Maglen, 1995. "The Role of Education and Training in the Economy," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 28(2), pages 128-147.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    training - innovation - workplace performance - productivity - labour - capital - Australian Workplace Industrial Relations Survey;

    JEL classification:

    • D - Microeconomics
    • O - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth

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