IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/wpa/wuwpit/0404006.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

E-Business And Global Sourcing – Inferences From Securities Exchanges

Author

Listed:
  • Steven Globerman

    (Western Washington University)

Abstract

This paper sets out a conceptual model that describes how the configuration of relevant geographic markets might change as electronic “gateways” or portals challenge conventional markets. It then considers the main conceptual inferences against the experience of securities markets. Consideration of empirical evidence suggests that e-business will lead to expanded geographic markets, although the pace and extent of the expansion might be slower and less dramatic, even in the long- run, than early enthusiasts of e-business may have anticipated.

Suggested Citation

  • Steven Globerman, 2004. "E-Business And Global Sourcing – Inferences From Securities Exchanges," International Trade 0404006, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:wpa:wuwpit:0404006
    Note: Type of Document - pdf
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://econwpa.ub.uni-muenchen.de/econ-wp/it/papers/0404/0404006.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Baumol, William J, 1982. "Contestable Markets: An Uprising in the Theory of Industry Structure," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 72(1), pages 1-15, March.
    2. James J. McAndrews & Chris Stefanadis, 2000. "The emergence of electronic communications networks in the U.S. equity markets," Current Issues in Economics and Finance, Federal Reserve Bank of New York, vol. 6(Oct).
    3. J. Christopher Westland & Theodore H. K. Clark, 1999. "Global Electronic Commerce: Theory and Case Studies," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262232057, January.
    4. J. Yannis Bakos & Erik Brynjolfsson, 1997. "From Vendors to Partners: Information Technology and Incomplete Contracts in Buyer-Supplier Relationships," Working Paper Series 154, MIT Center for Coordination Science.
    5. Steven Globerman & Thomas W Roehl & Stephen Standifird, 2001. "Globalization and Electronic Commerce: Inferences from Retail Brokering," Journal of International Business Studies, Palgrave Macmillan;Academy of International Business, vol. 32(4), pages 749-768, December.
    6. Brad M. Barber & Terrance Odean, 2001. "The Internet and the Investor," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 15(1), pages 41-54, Winter.
    7. Klein, Benjamin & Leffler, Keith B, 1981. "The Role of Market Forces in Assuring Contractual Performance," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 89(4), pages 615-641, August.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    geographic markets; securities markets; e-business;

    JEL classification:

    • F - International Economics

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:wpa:wuwpit:0404006. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (EconWPA). General contact details of provider: https://econwpa.ub.uni-muenchen.de .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.