IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/wpa/wuwpem/0308002.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Statistical properties of volatility in fractal dimension and probability distribution among six stock markets - USA, Japan, Taiwan, South Korea, Singapore, and Hong Kong

Author

Listed:
  • Hai-Chin YU

    (Chung Yuan University, Taiwan)

  • Ming-Chang Huang

    (Chung Yuan University, Taiwan)

Abstract

This study examines the statistical properties of volatility. Fractal dimension, probability distribution and two-point volatility correlation are used to measure and compare volatility among six different markets for the 12-year period from Jan. 1 1990 to Dec. 31 2001. New York market is found to be the strongest among the six in terms of market efficiency. Moreover, the Tokyo and Singapore markets are found to be very similar in fractal dimension and probability distribution, but different in their resistance to volatility : Tokyo has a higher ability to dissipate volatility. This phenomenon implies that the Tokyo market is more efficient than the Singapore market. The Hong Kong market is similar to the Singapore market in its ability to dissipate volatility. Meanwhile, the Taiwanese and Korean markets are the two most volatile markets among the six. Notably, the Taiwanese market is weaker than the Korean market in dissipating volatility.

Suggested Citation

  • Hai-Chin YU & Ming-Chang Huang, 2003. "Statistical properties of volatility in fractal dimension and probability distribution among six stock markets - USA, Japan, Taiwan, South Korea, Singapore, and Hong Kong," Econometrics 0308002, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 18 Aug 2003.
  • Handle: RePEc:wpa:wuwpem:0308002
    Note: Type of Document - Tex; prepared on IBM PC ; to print on HP/PostScript/Franciscan monk; pages: 34; figures: included/request from author/draw your own. We never published this piece and now we would like to reduce our mailing and xerox cost by posting it.
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://econwpa.ub.uni-muenchen.de/econ-wp/em/papers/0308/0308002.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Franklin Allen & Douglas Gale, 2000. "Financial Contagion," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 108(1), pages 1-33, February.
    2. Chang, Rosita P. & Ghon Rhee, S. & Soedigno, Susatio, 1995. "Price volatility of Indonesian stocks," Pacific-Basin Finance Journal, Elsevier, vol. 3(2-3), pages 337-355, July.
    3. Schwert, G William, 1990. "Stock Volatility and the Crash of '87," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 3(1), pages 77-102.
    4. Chan, Yue-cheong & John Wei, K. C., 1996. "Political risk and stock price volatility: The case of Hong Kong," Pacific-Basin Finance Journal, Elsevier, vol. 4(2-3), pages 259-275, July.
    5. Kristin J. Forbes & Roberto Rigobon, 2002. "No Contagion, Only Interdependence: Measuring Stock Market Comovements," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 57(5), pages 2223-2261, October.
    6. Arshanapalli, Bala & Doukas, John & Lang, Larry H. P., 1997. "Common volatility in the industrial structure of global capital markets," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 16(2), pages 189-209, April.
    7. Parameswaran Gopikrishnan & Vasiliki Plerou & Xavier Gabaix & H. Eugene Stanley, 2000. "Statistical Properties of Share Volume Traded in Financial Markets," Papers cond-mat/0008113, arXiv.org.
    8. Titman, Sheridan & John Wei, K. C., 1999. "Understanding stock market volatility: The case of Korea and Taiwan," Pacific-Basin Finance Journal, Elsevier, vol. 7(1), pages 41-66, February.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Volatility; fractal dimension; probability distribution.;

    JEL classification:

    • G15 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - International Financial Markets

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:wpa:wuwpem:0308002. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (EconWPA). General contact details of provider: https://econwpa.ub.uni-muenchen.de .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.