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An economic analysis of kin-provided child care

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  • P. D. Brandon

Abstract

This paper develops and evaluates a model of a mother's choice of kin-provided child care. Little is known about the choice of kin-provided child care, particularly within the context of intrafamily in-kind transfers. Despite this, kin-provided child care is extensively used, and its use affects family economic well-being. Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of the Class of 1972 (NLS'72), this study shows that variables affecting maternal use of market-provided child care also affect use of kin-provided child care. The study also reveals that the effects of variables on the choice of kin-provided child care are misleading when the direction of other in-kind transfers between a mother and her extended family is ignored. Estimated coefficients change sign and size depending upon whether a mother was giving material assistance to members of her extended family.

Suggested Citation

  • P. D. Brandon, "undated". "An economic analysis of kin-provided child care," Institute for Research on Poverty Discussion Papers 1076-95, University of Wisconsin Institute for Research on Poverty.
  • Handle: RePEc:wop:wispod:1076-95
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    File URL: http://www.irp.wisc.edu/publications/dps/pdfs/dp107695.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    3. David C. Ribar, 1992. "Child Care and the Labor Supply of Married Women: Reduced Form Evidence," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 27(1), pages 134-165.
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    12. Lampman, Robert J & Smeeding, Timothy M, 1983. "Interfamily Transfers as Alternatives to Government Transfers to Persons," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 29(1), pages 45-66, March.
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    Cited by:

    1. Colm Harmon & Claire Finn & Arnaud Chevalier & Tarja Viitanen, 2006. "The economics of early childhood care and education : technical research paper for the National Economic and Social Forum," Open Access publications 10197/671, School of Economics, University College Dublin.

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