IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/wiw/wiwrsa/ersa14p348.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Agglomeration economies and global activities: impact on firm survival

Author

Listed:
  • Anna Maria Ferragina
  • Fernanda Mazzotta

Abstract

The focus of our contribution is to shed light on the importance of firm agglomerations and FDI as drivers of firm survival in Italy. We focus upon different types of agglomeration economies related to the geographical context checking how these economies impact differently on heterogeneous firms survival and whether effects are robust to different estimators (Probit, Cox hazard models, Probit Heckman) and to different assumptions about inter-and intra-regional spillovers. The novelty our paper with respect to previous studies is twofold. First of all, we focus both on external economies and on firm internationalization, two crucial determinants of firm productivity and competitiveness and ultimately of firm survival. Hence, we consider the intertwined role of firm global activities with respect to the local drivers of firm dynamics by comparing foreign investors in Italy and Italian firms' investing abroad to domestic firms to catch a crucial source of heterogeneity of firm behavior with respect to external economies (correcting for the endogeneity of the FDI variables and for sample selection). Secondly, we use a very large dataset at firm level which takes into account several different dimensions at firm, industry and province level (previous studies are mostly at sectoral or at province/regional level) for more than 500,000 observations concerning Italian manufacturing corporate firms disaggregated by sector and by 103 provinces over a long span of time (2002-2010) which allows to also catch the effect of the crisis. With respect to agglomeration economies the paper analyses whether and how firms' exit choices are influenced by five different agglomeration indicators related to the geographical context: 1) External economies arising from localization economies due to the spatial concentration of firms in the same industry (GLAESER et al., 1992) and to 2) local production systems (Industrial districts); 3) External economies available to all local firms irrespective of sector and arising from urban size and density (urbanization economies); 4) External economies available to all local firms stemming from specialisation of firms in different varieties which may favour intra- and inter industry knowledge spillovers via Jacobs externalities (JACOBS, 1969); 5) diversification due to unrelated variety to capture the portfolio effect arising from the spatial concentration of firms belonging to different and non-complementary industries which may protect the region from sector-specific shocks (FRENKEN et al., 2007). We check whether the relevance of these agglomeration economies differ substantially between Italian firms and firm which invest in active or passive FDI. We get evidence on three issues: 1) Benefits from geographically and industry bounded specialisation for survival; 2) Industrial districts economies impact on firm survival 3) Diversification economies relevance.

Suggested Citation

  • Anna Maria Ferragina & Fernanda Mazzotta, 2014. "Agglomeration economies and global activities: impact on firm survival," ERSA conference papers ersa14p348, European Regional Science Association.
  • Handle: RePEc:wiw:wiwrsa:ersa14p348
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www-sre.wu.ac.at/ersa/ersaconfs/ersa14/e140826aFinal00348.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Mata, Jose & Portugal, Pedro, 1994. "Life Duration of New Firms," Journal of Industrial Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 42(3), pages 227-245, September.
    2. Georgios Fotopoulos & Helen Louri, 2000. "Determinants of Hazard Confronting New Entry: Does Financial Structure Matter?," Review of Industrial Organization, Springer;The Industrial Organization Society, vol. 17(3), pages 285-300, November.
    3. Gallegati Mauro & Greenwald Bruce & Richiardi Matteo G & Stiglitz Joseph E., 2008. "The Asymmetric Effect of Diffusion Processes: Risk Sharing and Contagion," Global Economy Journal, De Gruyter, vol. 8(3), pages 1-22, September.
    4. Lisa De Propris & Nigel Driffield & Stefano Menghinello, 2005. "local industrial systems and the location of FDI in Italy," International Journal of the Economics of Business, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 12(1), pages 105-121.
    5. Henderson, Vernon & Kuncoro, Ari & Turner, Matt, 1995. "Industrial Development in Cities," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 103(5), pages 1067-1090, October.
    6. Antonio Accetturo & Valter Di Giacinto & Giacinto Micucci & Marcello Pagnini, 2018. "Geography, productivity, and trade: Does selection explain why some locations are more productive than others?," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 58(5), pages 949-979, November.
    7. Massimiliano Mazzanti & Sandro Montresor & Paolo Pini, 2009. "What Drives (or Hampers) Outsourcing? Evidence for a Local Production System in Emilia Romagna," Industry and Innovation, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 16(3), pages 331-365.
    8. Valter Di Giacinto & Matteo Gomellini & Giacinto Micucci & Marcello Pagnini, 2014. "Mapping local productivity advantages in Italy: industrial districts, cities or both?," Journal of Economic Geography, Oxford University Press, vol. 14(2), pages 365-394.
    9. Giulio Cainelli & Donato Iacobucci, 2012. "Agglomeration, Related Variety, and Vertical Integration," Economic Geography, Clark University, vol. 88(3), pages 255-277, July.
    10. Davide Castellani & Giorgia Giovannetti, 2010. "Productivity and the international firm: dissecting heterogeneity," Journal of Economic Policy Reform, Taylor and Francis Journals, vol. 13(1), pages 25-42.
    11. Ferragina, Anna & Pittiglio, Rosanna & Reganati, Filippo, 2012. "Multinational status and firm exit in the Italian manufacturing and service sectors," Structural Change and Economic Dynamics, Elsevier, vol. 23(4), pages 363-372.
    12. Raffaello Bronzini, 2007. "FDI Inflows, Agglomeration and Host Country Firms' Size: Evidence from Italy," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 41(7), pages 963-978.
    13. Stefano Menghinello & Lisa De Propris & Nigel Driffield, 2010. "Industrial districts, inward foreign investment and regional development," Journal of Economic Geography, Oxford University Press, vol. 10(4), pages 539-558, July.
    14. Giulio Cainelli & Sandro Montresor & Marzetti Giuseppe Vittucci, 2012. "Firms’ death rate and spatial agglomeration. Evidence on the resilience of italian local Production systems," RIVISTA DI ECONOMIA E STATISTICA DEL TERRITORIO, FrancoAngeli Editore, vol. 2012(3), pages 101-126.
    15. Zoltán J. Ács & Catherine Armington & Ting Zhang, 2015. "The determinants of new-firm survival across regional economies: The role of human capital stock and knowledge spillover," Chapters, in: Global Entrepreneurship, Institutions and Incentives, chapter 18, pages 344-368, Edward Elgar Publishing.
    16. Roberto Antonietti & Giulio Cainelli, 2011. "The role of spatial agglomeration in a structural model of innovation, productivity and export: a firm-level analysis," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 46(3), pages 577-600, June.
    17. Olivier Godart & Holger Görg & Aoife Hanley, 2012. "Surviving the Crisis: Foreign Multinationals versus Domestic Firms," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 35(10), pages 1305-1321, October.
    18. Anna Ferragina & Fernanda Mazzotta, 2014. "FDI spillovers on firm survival in Italy: absorptive capacity matters!," The Journal of Technology Transfer, Springer, vol. 39(6), pages 859-897, December.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • C41 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods: Special Topics - - - Duration Analysis; Optimal Timing Strategies
    • F21 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Investment; Long-Term Capital Movements
    • F23 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - Multinational Firms; International Business
    • L25 - Industrial Organization - - Firm Objectives, Organization, and Behavior - - - Firm Performance

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:wiw:wiwrsa:ersa14p348. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Gunther Maier). General contact details of provider: http://www.ersa.org .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.