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Economic Residential Segregation and Educational Achievements: Evidence from Chile

  • Miguel Vargas Román


Using a database from Chile, we have tested empirically the effects of economic residential segregation on educational achievements. Our hypothesis is based on literature’s findings about segregation’s negative impact on individuals’ well being. We found that segregation has negative impacts. This result would have interesting policy implications and goes in the opposite directions of those investigations’ findings, which indicate that segregation has just negligible effects. Keywords: Segregation, Education, Selection Bias JEL codes: R20, R29

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Paper provided by European Regional Science Association in its series ERSA conference papers with number ersa12p170.

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Date of creation: Oct 2012
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Handle: RePEc:wiw:wiwrsa:ersa12p170
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  1. Dawkins, Casey J. & Shen, Qing & Sanchez, Thomas W., 2005. "Race, space, and unemployment duration," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 58(1), pages 91-113, July.
  2. John M. Clapp & Stephen L. Ross, 2001. "Schools and housing markets: an examination of school segregation and performance in Connecticut," Proceedings 910, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago.
  3. Susan E. Mayer, 2001. "How Economic Segregation Affects Children's Educational Attainment," JCPR Working Papers 235, Northwestern University/University of Chicago Joint Center for Poverty Research.
  4. Retamoso, Alejandro & Kaztman, Rubén, 2007. "Effects of urban segregation on education in Montevideo," Revista CEPAL, Naciones Unidas Comisión Económica para América Latina y el Caribe (CEPAL), April.
  5. Raquel Fernandez & Richard Rogerson, 1996. "Income Distribution, Communities, and the Quality of Public Education," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 111(1), pages 135-164.
  6. de Bartolome, Charles A M, 1990. "Equilibrium and Inefficiency in a Community Model with Peer Group Effects," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 98(1), pages 110-33, February.
  7. Dionysia Lambiri & Miguel Vargas, 2011. "Residential Segregation and Public Housing Policy, The Case of Chile," Working Papers 29, Facultad de Economía y Empresa, Universidad Diego Portales.
  8. Patrick McEwan, 2001. "The Effectiveness of Public, Catholic, and Non-Religious Private Schools in Chile's Voucher System," Education Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 9(2), pages 103-128.
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