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Identification of Strategic Industries: A Dynamic Perspective

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  • Bart Los

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Abstract

Every once in a while, national governments face difficult decision problems regarding financial support of important domestic firms or even entire national national industries. Similar problems are often faced by regional or urban governments. Given these problems, it is important to get indications of the societal value of industries. In principle, input-output tables provide a lot of information in revealing the linkages between industries. On the basis of these tables, various measures of the value of industries have been derived. One of these measures is found by applying the 'hypothetical extraction method', originally proposed by Strassert (Jahrb.Nat.Stat., 1968) and refined and applied by, among others, Milana (MetrEc., 1985), Groenewold, Hagger & Madden (Reg.Stud., 1987) and Dietzenbacher & Van der Linden (J.Reg.Sci., 1997). This approach has two major drawbacks. First, it is a purely static approach, in which technological progress does not play a role at all. Second, it assumes that output and employment levels are purely demand-determined. In this paper, I propose a biregional supply-side input-output model with two factors of production (high-skilled and low-skilled labor) and interregional interindustry technology spillovers. Applying hypothetical extraction methods to this model yields an alternative framework for identifying important sectors in a dynamic sense.

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  • Bart Los, 2001. "Identification of Strategic Industries: A Dynamic Perspective," ERSA conference papers ersa01p112, European Regional Science Association.
  • Handle: RePEc:wiw:wiwrsa:ersa01p112
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    Cited by:

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    3. Umed Temurshoev, 2010. "Identifying Optimal Sector Groupings With The Hypothetical Extraction Method," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 50(4), pages 872-890, October.
    4. Lampiris, Georgios & Karelakis, Christos & Loizou, Efstratios, 2018. "Evaluation of the impacts of CAP policy measures on a local economy: The case of a Greek region," Land Use Policy, Elsevier, vol. 77(C), pages 745-751.
    5. Miguel, Francisco Javier de & Llop Llop, Maria & Manresa, Antonio, 1954-, 2011. "Simulating the Impact of Sectorial Productivity Gains on Two Regional Economies: Key Sectors from a Supply Side Perspective," Working Papers 2072/169681, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Department of Economics.
    6. Henrique Morrone, 2018. "Which Sectors To Stimulate First In Brazil? Estimating The Sectoral Power To Pull The Economy Out Of The Recession," Anais do XLIV Encontro Nacional de Economia [Proceedings of the 44th Brazilian Economics Meeting] 95, ANPEC - Associação Nacional dos Centros de Pós-Graduação em Economia [Brazilian Association of Graduate Programs in Economics].
    7. Raffaele Giammetti & Alberto Russo & Mauro Gallegati, 2020. "Key sectors in input–output production networks: An application to Brexit," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 43(4), pages 840-870, April.
    8. Valerija Botric, 2013. "Identifying Key Sectors in Croatian Economy Based on Input-Output Tables," Working Papers 1302, The Institute of Economics, Zagreb.
    9. Karyn Morrissey, 2016. "A location quotient approach to producing regional production multipliers for the Irish economy," Papers in Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 95(3), pages 491-506, August.
    10. Kraftova Ivana & Chladek Tomas & Minarik Jakub, 2011. "Do Globalisation and Economic Cycles Reduce the Sector Inequality of Supra-Regions?," European Spatial Research and Policy, Sciendo, vol. 18(2), pages 111-127, November.

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