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Simulating the Impact of Sectorial Productivity Gains on Two Regional Economies: Key Sectors from a Supply Side Perspective

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  • Miguel, Francisco Javier de
  • Llop Llop, Maria
  • Manresa, Antonio, 1954-

Abstract

In this paper we simulate and analyse the economic impact that sectorial productivity gains have on two regional Spanish economies (Catalonia and Extremadura). In particular we study the quantitative effect that each sector’s productivity gain has on household welfare (real disposable income and equivalent variation), on the consumption price indices and factor relative prices, on real production (GDP) and on the government’s net income (net taxation revenues of social transfers to households). The analytical approach consists of a computable general equilibrium model, in which we assume perfect competition and cleared markets, including factor markets. All the parameters and exogenous variables of the model are calibrated by means of two social accounting matrices, one for each region under study. The results allow us to identify those sectors with the greatest impact on consumer welfare as the key sectors in the regional economies. Keywords: Productivity gains, key sectors, computable general equilibrium

Suggested Citation

  • Miguel, Francisco Javier de & Llop Llop, Maria & Manresa, Antonio, 1954-, 2011. "Simulating the Impact of Sectorial Productivity Gains on Two Regional Economies: Key Sectors from a Supply Side Perspective," Working Papers 2072/169681, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:urv:wpaper:2072/169681
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Manuel Alejandro Cardenete & Ferran Sancho, 2012. "The Role Of Supply Constraints In Multiplier Analysis," Economic Systems Research, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 24(1), pages 21-34, June.
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    8. Bart Los, 2004. "Identification of strategic industries: A dynamic perspective," Papers in Regional Science, Springer;Regional Science Association International, vol. 83(4), pages 669-698, October.
    9. María Llop & Antonio Manresa & Francisco Javier de Miguel, 2002. "Comparación de Cataluña y Extremadura a través de matrices de contabilidad social," Investigaciones Economicas, Fundación SEPI, vol. 26(3), pages 573-587, September.
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    12. Francisco Miguel-Vélez & Manuel Cardenete Flores & Jesús Pérez-Mayo, 2009. "Effects of the tax on retail sales of some fuels on a regional economy: a computable general equilibrium approach," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 43(3), pages 781-806, September.
    13. Kenneth Hanson & Adam Rose, 1997. "Factor productivity and income inequality: a general equilibrium analysis," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 29(8), pages 1061-1071.
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    Cited by:

    1. Miguel Vélez, Francisco Javier de & Llop Llop, Maria & Manresa, Antonio, 1954-, 2013. "Supply Multipliers in Two Regional Economies," Working Papers 2072/213636, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Department of Economics.

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