IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/pab/wphaei/17.01.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

A multiplier evaluation of primary factors supply–shocks

Author

Listed:
  • M. Alejandro Cardenete

    () (Department of Economics, Universidad Loyola Andalucía)

  • M. Carmen Lima

    () (Department of Economics, Quantitative Methods and Economic History, Universidad Pablo de Olavide)

  • Ferran Sancho

    () (Department of Economics, Universidat Autònoma de Barcelona)

Abstract

Demand-side multipliers have ruled within multisectoral models as the main indicators for policy effectiveness and key-sector determination. The causal link between new exogenous final demand and responded endogenous total output is well understood and has been the basis for such a prevalent demand-side analysis both in linear interindustry analysis and in non-linear applied general equilibrium models. In this paper we shift the perspective to supply-side injections and we do so by studying the repercussion effects of marshalling additional primary factors, labor and capital services, which are injected into the economy and give rise to a general resource reallocation. As a result, we obtain estimates of supply multipliers that provide complementary information to standard demand multipliers. We illustrate the methodology using an empirical general equilibrium model built with the most recent data for the region of Andalusia, Spain.

Suggested Citation

  • M. Alejandro Cardenete & M. Carmen Lima & Ferran Sancho, 2017. "A multiplier evaluation of primary factors supply–shocks," Working Papers 17.01, Universidad Pablo de Olavide, Department of Economics, Quantitative Methods and Economic History.
  • Handle: RePEc:pab:wphaei:17.01
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.upo.es/serv/bib/wphaei/haei1701.pdf
    File Function: First version, 2017
    Download Restriction: no
    ---><---

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Miguel Vélez, Francisco Javier de & Llop Llop, Maria & Manresa, Antonio, 1954-, 2013. "Supply Multipliers in Two Regional Economies," Working Papers 2072/213636, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Department of Economics.
    2. Manuel Alejandro Cardenete & Ferran Sancho, 2012. "The Role Of Supply Constraints In Multiplier Analysis," Economic Systems Research, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 24(1), pages 21-34, June.
    3. Ana-Isabel Guerra & Ferran Sancho, 2011. "Budget-constrained expenditure multipliers," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 18(13), pages 1259-1262.
    4. Victor Ginsburgh & Michiel Keyzer, 2002. "The Structure of Applied General Equilibrium Models," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262571579, February.
    5. Jan Oosterhaven & Dirk Stelder, 2002. "Net Multipliers Avoid Exaggerating Impacts: With A Bi–Regional Illustration for the Dutch Transportation Sector," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 42(3), pages 533-543, August.
    6. Strassert Günter, 1968. "Zur Bestimmung strategischer Sektoren mit Hilfe von Input-Output-Modellen," Journal of Economics and Statistics (Jahrbuecher fuer Nationaloekonomie und Statistik), De Gruyter, vol. 182(1), pages 211-215, February.
    7. Welsch, Heinz, 2008. "Armington elasticities for energy policy modeling: Evidence from four European countries," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(5), pages 2252-2264, September.
    8. Francisco Miguel & Maria Llop & Antonio Manresa, 2014. "Sectoral productivity gains in two regional economies: key sectors from a supply-side perspective," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 53(3), pages 731-744, November.
    9. Erik Dietzenbacher, 2005. "More on multipliers," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 45(2), pages 421-426, May.
    10. Robinson, Sherman & Roland-Holst, David W., 1988. "Macroeconomic structure and computable general equilibrium models," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 10(3), pages 353-375.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Most related items

    These are the items that most often cite the same works as this one and are cited by the same works as this one.
    1. Manuel Alejandro Cardenete & Ferran Sancho, 2012. "The Role Of Supply Constraints In Multiplier Analysis," Economic Systems Research, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 24(1), pages 21-34, June.
    2. M. Alejandro Cardenete & M. Carmen Lima & Ferran Sancho, 2013. "Are There Key Sectors? An Appraisal Using Applied General Equilibrium," The Review of Regional Studies, Southern Regional Science Association, vol. 43(2,3), pages 111-129, Winter.
    3. Miguel, Francisco Javier de & Llop Llop, Maria & Manresa, Antonio, 1954-, 2011. "Simulating the Impact of Sectorial Productivity Gains on Two Regional Economies: Key Sectors from a Supply Side Perspective," Working Papers 2072/169681, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Department of Economics.
    4. Erik Dietzenbacher & Manfred Lenzen & Bart Los & Dabo Guan & Michael L. Lahr & Ferran Sancho & Sangwon Suh & Cuihong Yang, 2013. "Input--Output Analysis: The Next 25 Years," Economic Systems Research, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 25(4), pages 369-389, December.
    5. Afonso, António & Gomes, Pedro & Taamouti, Abderrahim, 2014. "Sovereign credit ratings, market volatility, and financial gains," Computational Statistics & Data Analysis, Elsevier, vol. 76(C), pages 20-33.
    6. Gunnar Lindberg, 2011. "On the appropriate use of (input-output) coefficients to generate non-survey regional input-output tables: Implications for the determination of output multipliers," ERSA conference papers ersa10p800, European Regional Science Association.
    7. onder Nomaler & Bart Verspagen, 2008. "Knowledge Flows, Patent Citations and the Impact of Science on Technology," Economic Systems Research, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 20(4), pages 339-366.
    8. Ferran Sancho, 2013. "Some conceptual difficulties regarding ‘net’ multipliers," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 51(2), pages 537-552, October.
    9. Lenzen, Manfred & Murray, Joy & Sack, Fabian & Wiedmann, Thomas, 2007. "Shared producer and consumer responsibility -- Theory and practice," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 61(1), pages 27-42, February.
    10. Francisco Miguel & Maria Llop & Antonio Manresa, 2014. "Sectoral productivity gains in two regional economies: key sectors from a supply-side perspective," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 53(3), pages 731-744, November.
    11. Christos FLOROS & Pierre FAILLER, 2010. "Development of a Computable General Equilibrium (CGE) Model for Fisheries," EcoMod2004 330600052, EcoMod.
    12. Giannis Karagiannis & Vangelis Tzouvelekas, 2010. "Sectoral linkages and industrial efficiency: a dilemma or a requisition in identifying development priorities?," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 45(1), pages 207-233, August.
    13. João Do Amaral & João Dias & João Lopes, 2012. "A new kind of production and value-added multiplier for assessing the scale and structure effects of demand shocks in input–output frameworks," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 49(1), pages 103-115, August.
    14. Antonio Carlos Moretto & João Dias & João Carlos Lopes, & Rossana Lott Rodrigues, 2013. "Effects of demand shocks in the Brazilian economy: new production and value added multipliers," Working Papers Department of Economics 2013/22, ISEG - Lisbon School of Economics and Management, Department of Economics, Universidade de Lisboa.
    15. Löfgren, Hans & Harris, Rebecca Lee & Robinson, Sherman, 2001. "A standard computable general equilibrium (CGE) model in GAMS," TMD discussion papers 75, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    16. Miguel Vélez, Francisco Javier de & Llop Llop, Maria & Manresa, Antonio, 1954-, 2013. "Supply Multipliers in Two Regional Economies," Working Papers 2072/213636, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Department of Economics.
    17. Andrew Dyck & U. Sumaila, 2010. "Economic impact of ocean fish populations in the global fishery," Journal of Bioeconomics, Springer, vol. 12(3), pages 227-243, October.
    18. Haider A. Khan, 2007. "Social Accounting Matrix: A Very Short Introduction for Economic Modeling," CIRJE F-Series CIRJE-F-477, CIRJE, Faculty of Economics, University of Tokyo.
    19. Pogany, Peter, 2013. "Thermodynamic Isolation and the New World Order," MPRA Paper 49924, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    20. Olga Kiuila & Thomas F. Rutherford, 2014. "Economic modeling approaches: optimization versus equilibrium," Working Papers 2014-04, Faculty of Economic Sciences, University of Warsaw.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Supply multipliers; applied general equilibrium; supply-side key sectors;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • C63 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Mathematical Methods; Programming Models; Mathematical and Simulation Modeling - - - Computational Techniques
    • C68 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Mathematical Methods; Programming Models; Mathematical and Simulation Modeling - - - Computable General Equilibrium Models
    • R13 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - General Equilibrium and Welfare Economic Analysis of Regional Economies

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:pab:wphaei:17.01. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Publicación Digital - UPO). General contact details of provider: https://edirc.repec.org/data/dmupoes.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.