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The Magnet Effect of Circuit Breakers: A role of price jumps and market liquidity

Author

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  • Zhihong Jian
  • Zhican Zhu
  • Jie Zhou
  • Shuai Wu

Abstract

This paper studies the magnet effect of market-wide circuit breakers and examines its possible forms using high-frequency data from the Chinese stock index futures market. Unlike previous studies that mainly analyzed the price trend and volatility, this paper is the first to consider the intraday price jump behavior in studying the magnet effect. We find that when a market-wide trading halt is imminent, the probability of a price decrease and the level of market volatility remain stable. However, the conditional probability of observing a price jump increases significantly, leading to a higher possibility of triggering market-wide circuit breakers, which is in support of the magnet effect hypothesis. In addition, we find a significant increase in liquidity demand and insignificant change in liquidity supply ahead of a market-wide trading halt, suggesting that the deterioration of market liquidity may play an important role in explaining the magnet effect.

Suggested Citation

  • Zhihong Jian & Zhican Zhu & Jie Zhou & Shuai Wu, 2018. "The Magnet Effect of Circuit Breakers: A role of price jumps and market liquidity," Departmental Working Papers 2018-01, The University of Winnipeg, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:win:winwop:2018-01
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    File URL: http://economics.uwinnipeg.ca/RePEc/winwop/2018-01.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Sifat, Imtiaz Mohammad & Mohamad, Azhar, 2020. "A survey on the magnet effect of circuit breakers in financial markets," International Review of Economics & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 69(C), pages 138-151.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • G10 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - General (includes Measurement and Data)
    • G12 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Asset Pricing; Trading Volume; Bond Interest Rates
    • G18 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Government Policy and Regulation

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