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Political Rebound Effects as Stumbling Blocks for Socio-ecological Transition

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  • Karl Aiginger

    (WIFO)

Abstract

This paper analyses why many citizens believe that the current social and economic system is far from optimal, but do not vote for a change in the desired direction in election processes. There is an increasing erosion of central political parties, and new populist parties are appearing at both extremes of the political spectrum. They are good at attracting angry and disappointed voters but are unable to offer consistent concepts that can produce a social economic system with efficiency, social inclusion and environmental sustainability. Since populist parties agree on what they do not want, and not where to go, both right-wing and left-wing parties are able to cooperate against the prevailing system.

Suggested Citation

  • Karl Aiginger, 2016. "Political Rebound Effects as Stumbling Blocks for Socio-ecological Transition," WIFO Working Papers 519, WIFO.
  • Handle: RePEc:wfo:wpaper:y:2016:i:519
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