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Income Inequality: Implications and Relevant Economic Policies

Author

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  • Philip Arestis

    () (University of Cambridge, UK)

  • Ana Rosa Gonzalez-Martinez

    () (Cambridge Econometrics, UK)

Abstract

The aim of this contribution is to discuss closely the implications of income inequality and the economic policies to tackle it, especially so in view of inequality being one of the main causes of the 2007/2008 international financial crisis and the “great recession” that subsequently emerged. Wealth inequality is also important in this respect, but the focus is on income inequality. Ever since the financial crisis and the subsequent “great recession”, inequality of income, and wealth, has increased and the demand for economic policy initia- tives to produce a more equal distribution of income and wealth has become more urgent. Such reduction would help to increase the level of economic activity as has been demonstrated again more recently. A number of economic policy initiatives for this purpose will be the focus of this contribution.

Suggested Citation

  • Philip Arestis & Ana Rosa Gonzalez-Martinez, 2016. "Income Inequality: Implications and Relevant Economic Policies," Panoeconomicus, Savez ekonomista Vojvodine, Novi Sad, Serbia, vol. 63(1), pages 1-24, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:voj:journl:v:63:y:2016:i:1:p:1-24
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Income inequality; Economic activity; Redistribution of income; Economic policies;

    JEL classification:

    • D31 - Microeconomics - - Distribution - - - Personal Income and Wealth Distribution
    • E25 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Aggregate Factor Income Distribution
    • E61 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Macroeconomic Policy, Macroeconomic Aspects of Public Finance, and General Outlook - - - Policy Objectives; Policy Designs and Consistency; Policy Coordination

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