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Opening the Capital Account of Transition Economies: How Much and How Fast

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  • Daniel Daianu

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  • Radu Vranceanu

    ()

Abstract

In the late eighties, many developing countries followed the example of the most advanced countries and opened their capital account (K.A.) in an attempt to reap new gains from increased integration with the world economy. By 2000, after the wave of financial and currency crises that hurt the global economy in the last decade, enthusiasm about K.A. liberalization has much faded. Firstly, the relationship between development and capital account liberalization did not come out to be as solid as initially expected; secondly, greater capital mobility has brought about increased global financial instability. New thinking in international economics calls for proper sequencing in opening the K.A.: liberalization should proceed in step with progress in macroeconomic stability, structural reform and creation of a sound internal financial system. In this paper, we analyze to what extent and at what pace should transition economies carry out the K.A. liberalization process.

Suggested Citation

  • Daniel Daianu & Radu Vranceanu, 2002. "Opening the Capital Account of Transition Economies: How Much and How Fast," William Davidson Institute Working Papers Series 511, William Davidson Institute at the University of Michigan.
  • Handle: RePEc:wdi:papers:2002-511
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    Cited by:

    1. Boubakri, Salem & Guillaumin, Cyriac, 2011. "Financial integration and currency risk premium in CEECs: Evidence from the ICAPM," Emerging Markets Review, Elsevier, vol. 12(4), pages 460-484.
    2. Mathilde Maurel, 2004. "Financial Integration, Exchange Rate Regimes in CEECs, and joining the EMU : Just Do It," Working Papers hal-01065481, HAL.
    3. Daniel Daianu, 2004. "Policy Diversity as an Engine of Development," European Journal of Comparative Economics, Cattaneo University (LIUC), vol. 1(1), pages 33-58, June.
    4. Carmignani, Fabrizio & Chowdhury, Abdur R., 2005. "Does Financial Openness Promote Economic Integration? Some Evidence from Europe and the CIS," WIDER Working Paper Series 074, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    5. Fabrizio Carmignani & Abdur Chowdhury, 2005. "The Impact of Financial Openness on Economic Integration: Evidence from the Europe and the Cis," Working Papers 88, University of Milano-Bicocca, Department of Economics, revised Apr 2005.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    capital mobility; capital outflows; financial instability; transition;

    JEL classification:

    • P33 - Economic Systems - - Socialist Institutions and Their Transitions - - - International Trade, Finance, Investment, Relations, and Aid
    • F21 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Investment; Long-Term Capital Movements
    • F32 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - Current Account Adjustment; Short-term Capital Movements
    • F36 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - Financial Aspects of Economic Integration

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