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Who is coming from Vanuatu to New Zealand under the new recognized Seasonal employer program ?

Author

Listed:
  • McKenzie, David
  • Garcia Martinez, Pilar
  • Winters, L. Alan

Abstract

New Zealand's new Recognized Seasonal Employer program allows workers from the Pacific Islands to come to New Zealand for up to seven months to work in the horticulture and viticulture industries. One of the explicit objectives of the program is to encourage economic development in the Pacific. This paper reports the results of a baseline survey taken in Vanuatu, which the authors use to examine who wants to participate in the program, and who is selected among those interested. The findings show that the main participants are males in their late 20s to early 40s, and most are married and have children. Most workers are subsistence farmers in Vanuatu and have not completed more than 10 years of schooling. Such workers would be unlikely to be accepted under existing migration channels. Nevertheless, the program workers from Vanuatu tend to come from wealthier households, and have better English literacy and health than individuals not applying for the program. Lack of knowledge about the policy and the costs of applying appear to be the main barriers preventing poorer individuals applying.

Suggested Citation

  • McKenzie, David & Garcia Martinez, Pilar & Winters, L. Alan, 2008. "Who is coming from Vanuatu to New Zealand under the new recognized Seasonal employer program ?," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4699, The World Bank.
  • Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbrwps:4699
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    File URL: http://www-wds.worldbank.org/external/default/WDSContentServer/WDSP/IB/2008/08/25/000158349_20080825143952/Rendered/PDF/WPS4699.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. McKenzie, David & Gibson, John & Stillman, Steven, 2006. "How important is selection ? Experimental versus non-experimental measures of the income gains from migration," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3906, The World Bank.
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    Cited by:

    1. John Gibson & David McKenzie & Halahingano Rohorua, 2014. "Development Impacts of Seasonal and Temporary Migration: A Review of Evidence from the Pacific and Southeast Asia," Asia and the Pacific Policy Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 1(1), pages 18-32, January.
    2. John Gibson & David McKenzie, 2014. "Development through seasonal worker programs: the case of New Zealand’s RSE program," Chapters,in: International Handbook on Migration and Economic Development, chapter 7, pages 186-210 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    3. World Bank, 2014. "Well-being from Work in the Pacific Island Countries," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 18642.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Access to Finance; Health Monitoring&Evaluation; Labor Markets; Housing&Human Habitats; Work&Working Conditions;

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