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Enhancing the development impact of migration

Listed author(s):
  • Luca Barbone

    ()

    (World Bank)

  • Andrew Dabalen

    ()

    (World Bank)

Migration is a phenomenon that reflects economic, social and demographic imbalances across countries and requires a multi-disciplinary approach to understand and manage. This paper offers some observations on the complex issue of the development impact of migration. It will do so by commenting on three broad questions. First, how and in what ways is migration important for development? Second, what are the costs and benefits of migration for developing and developed countries? And finally, what are the strategic choices that countries – both receiving and sending – are facing, and what do we know and not know on how to advise them?

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File URL: http://www.bankikredyt.nbp.pl/content/2009/06/bik_06_2009_03_art.pdf
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Article provided by National Bank of Poland, Economic Institute in its journal Bank i Kredyt.

Volume (Year): 40 (2009)
Issue (Month): 6 ()
Pages: 59-76

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Handle: RePEc:nbp:nbpbik:v:40:y:2009:i:6:p:59-76
Note: Earlier version of the article was presented at the Conference on Migration, Labour Markets, and Economic Growth in Europe after Enlargement, 8–9 December, 2008, Warsaw, Poland. We would like to thank Dilip Ratha, Sanket Mohapatra, Paulina Holda, two anonymous reviewersand conference participants for useful comments.
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  1. McKenzie, David & Gibson, John & Stillman, Steven, 2006. "How important is selection ? Experimental versus non-experimental measures of the income gains from migration," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3906, The World Bank.
  2. Gordon H. Hanson, 2008. "The Economic Consequences of the International Migration of Labor," NBER Working Papers 14490, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Calero, Carla & Bedi, Arjun S. & Sparrow, Robert, 2008. "Remittances, Liquidity Constraints and Human Capital Investments in Ecuador," IZA Discussion Papers 3358, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
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  6. Gabriel J. Felbermayr & Wido Geis & Wilhelm Kohler, 2008. "Restrictive Immigration Policy in Germany: Pains and Gains Foregone?," CESifo Working Paper Series 2316, CESifo Group Munich.
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  9. David J. McKenzie & Nicole Hildebrandt, 2005. "The Effects of Migration on Child Health in Mexico," ECONOMIA JOURNAL OF THE LATIN AMERICAN AND CARIBBEAN ECONOMIC ASSOCIATION, ECONOMIA JOURNAL OF THE LATIN AMERICAN AND CARIBBEAN ECONOMIC ASSOCIATION, vol. 0(Fall 2005), pages 257-289, August.
  10. Tito Boeri & Herbert Brücker, 2005. "Why are Europeans so tough on migrants?," Economic Policy, CEPR;CES;MSH, vol. 20(44), pages 629-703, October.
  11. Card, David, 2001. "Immigrant Inflows, Native Outflows, and the Local Labor Market Impacts of Higher Immigration," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 19(1), pages 22-64, January.
  12. Martin Kahanec & Klaus F. Zimmermann, 2008. "Migration in an Enlarged EU: A Challenging Solution?," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 849, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
  13. AnnaLee Saxenian, 2002. "Silicon Valley’s New Immigrant High-Growth Entrepreneurs," Economic Development Quarterly, , vol. 16(1), pages 20-31, February.
  14. Terry F. Buss, 2002. "Emerging High-Growth Firms and Economic Development Policy," Economic Development Quarterly, , vol. 16(1), pages 17-19, February.
  15. Alejandra Cox Edwards & Manuelita Ureta, 2003. "International Migration, Remittances, and Schooling: Evidence from El Salvador," NBER Working Papers 9766, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  16. Edwards, Alejandra Cox & Ureta, Manuelita, 2003. "International migration, remittances, and schooling: evidence from El Salvador," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 72(2), pages 429-461, December.
  17. de Brauw, Alan & Rozelle, Scott, 2008. "Migration and household investment in rural China," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 19(2), pages 320-335, June.
  18. Bauer, Thomas K. & Zimmermann, Klaus F., 1999. "Report No. 3: Assessment of Possible Migration Pressure and its Labour Market Impact Following EU Enlargement to Central and Eastern Europe," IZA Research Reports 3, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
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