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Teaching in Cambodia


  • Luis Benveniste
  • Jeffery Marshall
  • M. Caridad Araujo


No abstract is available for this item.

Suggested Citation

  • Luis Benveniste & Jeffery Marshall & M. Caridad Araujo, 2008. "Teaching in Cambodia," World Bank Other Operational Studies 8073, The World Bank.
  • Handle: RePEc:wbk:wboper:8073

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Esther Duflo & Rema Hanna, 2005. "Monitoring Works: Getting Teachers to Come to School," Working Papers id:301, eSocialSciences.
    2. Deon Filmer & Norbert Schady, 2008. "Getting Girls into School: Evidence from a Scholarship Program in Cambodia," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 56, pages 581-617.
    3. Nazmul Chaudhury & Jeffrey Hammer & Michael Kremer & Karthik Muralidharan & F. Halsey Rogers, 2006. "Missing in Action: Teacher and Health Worker Absence in Developing Countries," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 20(1), pages 91-116, Winter.
    4. Sawada, Yasayuki & Lokshin, Michael, 2001. "Household schooling decisions in rural Pakistan," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2541, The World Bank.
    5. Emiliana Vegas, 2005. "Incentives to Improve Teaching : Lessons from Latin America," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 7265.
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    Cited by:

    1. Bray, Mark & Kobakhidze, Magda Nutsa & Liu, Junyan & Zhang, Wei, 2016. "The internal dynamics of privatised public education: Fee-charging supplementary tutoring provided by teachers in Cambodia," International Journal of Educational Development, Elsevier, vol. 49(C), pages 291-299.
    2. Dridi, Mohamed, 2013. "Corruption dans le Secteur d'Education : Une Typologie de Conséquences
      [Corruption Within Education Sector : A Typology of Consequences]
      ," MPRA Paper 46874, University Library of Munich, Germany.


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