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Cash for work in Sierra Leone : a case study on the design and implementation of a safety net in response to a crisis

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Listed:
  • Andrews, Colin
  • Ovadiya, Mirey
  • Ribes Ros, Christophe
  • Wodon, Quentin

Abstract

This paper presents an assessment of the first phase (2008?2009) of Sierra Leone's cash for work program based on a qualitative and quantitative analysis examining program design features, mainprocesses and impact. The assessment highlights that while cash for work was an appropriate crisis response, the challenge of achieving good targeting should not be underestimated. Findings from the assessment point to high inclusion errors of non?poor population quintiles, despite the program apparently many rules of best practice in program design. The assessment points to a series of factors to explain targeting performance, and future strategies consider mixed methods with a greater emphasis on the role of communities in affecting overall outcomes. The assessment notes areas of success during implementation, including the impact of the program in promoting cohesion amongst youth groups, as well as women. In this sense the assessment points to future strategies and options for moving cash for work forward under its expanded incarnation of the Youth Employment Support Project. Through the use of light qualitative and quantitative methods, the paper also advocates for similar assessments where monitoring and evaluation capacity are weak and time constraints tight.

Suggested Citation

  • Andrews, Colin & Ovadiya, Mirey & Ribes Ros, Christophe & Wodon, Quentin, 2012. "Cash for work in Sierra Leone : a case study on the design and implementation of a safety net in response to a crisis," Social Protection and Labor Policy and Technical Notes 73719, The World Bank.
  • Handle: RePEc:wbk:hdnspu:73719
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Quentin Wodon & Hassan Zaman, 2010. "Higher Food Prices in Sub-Saharan Africa: Poverty Impact and Policy Responses," World Bank Research Observer, World Bank Group, vol. 25(1), pages 157-176, February.
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    Cited by:

    1. Umapathi, Nithin & Wang, Dewen & O'Keefe, Philip, 2013. "Eligibility thresholds for minimum living guarantee programs : international practices and implications for China," Social Protection and Labor Policy and Technical Notes 83118, The World Bank.
    2. Robalino, David A. & Weber, Michael, 2013. "Designing and implementing unemployment benefit systems in middle and low income countries : key choices between insurance and savings accounts," Social Protection and Labor Policy and Technical Notes 90348, The World Bank.
    3. Cerutti, Paula & Fruttero, Anna & Grosh, Margaret & Kostenbaum, Silvana & Oliveri, Maria Laura & Rodriguez-Alas, Claudia & Strokova, Victoria, 2014. "Social assistance and labor market programs in Latin America : methodology and key findings from the social protection database," Social Protection and Labor Policy and Technical Notes 88769, The World Bank.
    4. Robalino, David & Margolis, David & Rother, Friederike & Newhouse, David & Lundberg, Mattias, 2013. "Youth employment : a human development agenda for the next decade," Social Protection and Labor Policy and Technical Notes 83925, The World Bank.
    5. Dorfman, Mark & Palacios, Robert, 2012. "World Bank support for pensions and social security," Social Protection and Labor Policy and Technical Notes 70925, The World Bank.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Safety Nets and Transfers; Rural Poverty Reduction; Housing&Human Habitats; Poverty Monitoring&Analysis; Labor Markets;

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