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Natural disasters : what is the role for social safety nets?

Author

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  • Pelham, Larissa
  • Clay, Edward
  • Braunholz, Tim

Abstract

This paper makes the case for why safety nets are an important tool for managing the risk of natural hazards. The use of safety nets is advocated both ex ante, to prevent and mitigate the impact of natural disaster and ex post, to cope with the impacts of natural shocks. Firstly, the paper explores the implications of contextual factors to be taken into account in the design of an effective safety net system to respond to the needs generated by natural disasters. Learning from the responses to a number of recent natural disasters, a typology of the different types of natural hazards which require different approaches to reduce their risk is introduced. Secondly, the paper considers some'guidelines'for improving the design and implementation of safety nets either to prevent and/or to recover from natural disasters. Finally, some conclusions and recommendations for more effective safety net and suggestions for addressing key issues are outlined.

Suggested Citation

  • Pelham, Larissa & Clay, Edward & Braunholz, Tim, 2011. "Natural disasters : what is the role for social safety nets?," Social Protection and Labor Policy and Technical Notes 59699, The World Bank.
  • Handle: RePEc:wbk:hdnspu:59699
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    File URL: http://www-wds.worldbank.org/servlet/WDSContentServer/WDSP/IB/2011/02/18/000333038_20110218040909/Rendered/PDF/596990NWP0SP0D10Box358292B01PUBLIC1.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Vakis, Renos & Kruger, Diana & Mason, Andrew D., 2004. "Shocks and coffee : lessons from Nicaragua," Social Protection and Labor Policy and Technical Notes 30164, The World Bank.
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    Cited by:

    1. Carlo del Ninno & Bradford Mills, 2015. "Safety Nets in Africa : Effective Mechanisms to Reach the Poor and Most Vulnerable," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 21369.
    2. Karim, Azreen & Noy, Ilan, 2015. "The (mis) allocation of public spending in a low income country: Evidence from disaster risk reduction spending in Bangladesh," Working Paper Series 4194, Victoria University of Wellington, School of Economics and Finance.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Safety Nets and Transfers; Hazard Risk Management; Food&Beverage Industry; Labor Policies; Natural Disasters;

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