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Religion and the European Union

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Abstract

We review a recent literature on cultural differences across euro member states. We point out that this literature fails to address cultural differences between Protestants and Catholics, which are likely a major underlying reason for cross-country differences. We argue that confessional culture explains why Catholic countries tend to have weaker institutions but are more open to economic and political integration. EU policies after the economic crisis looked clumsy and failed to address all concerns, but were viable, caused only a manageable amount of serious backlash and tied in well with Europe’s cultural diversity, also providing scope for learning and adaption.

Suggested Citation

  • Benito Arruñada & Matthias Krapf, 2018. "Religion and the European Union," Economics Working Papers 1601, Department of Economics and Business, Universitat Pompeu Fabra, revised Jun 2018.
  • Handle: RePEc:upf:upfgen:1601
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Adrian Chadi & Matthias Krapf, 2017. "The Protestant Fiscal Ethic: Religious Confession And Euro Skepticism In Germany," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 55(4), pages 1813-1832, October.
    2. Guiso, Luigi & Herrera, Helios & Morelli, Massimo, 2016. "Cultural Differences and Institutional Integration," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 99(S1), pages 97-113.
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    5. Benito Arruñada, 2010. "Protestants and Catholics: Similar Work Ethic, Different Social Ethic," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 120(547), pages 890-918, September.
    6. Becker, Sascha O. & Pfaff, Steven & Rubin, Jared, 2016. "Causes and consequences of the Protestant Reformation," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 62(C), pages 1-25.
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    10. Luigi Guiso & Paola Sapienza & Luigi Zingales, 2016. "Monnet’s error?," Economic Policy, CEPR;CES;MSH, vol. 31(86), pages 247-297.
    11. Christopher L. Colvin & Matthew McCracken, 2017. "Work Ethic, Social Ethic, no Ethic: Measuring the Economic Values of Modern Christians," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 32(5), pages 1043-1053, August.
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    Blog mentions

    As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
    1. Religion and the European Union
      by maximorossi in NEP-LTV blog on 2018-04-03 14:05:33
    2. Religion and the European Union
      by maximorossi in NEP-LTV blog on 2018-05-17 20:24:46

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    Cited by:

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    European Union; religion; values; culture.;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • Z12 - Other Special Topics - - Cultural Economics - - - Religion
    • F15 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Economic Integration

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