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Work Ethic, Social Ethic, No Ethic: Measuring the Economic Values of Modern Christians

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  • Christopher L. Colvin
  • Matthew McCracken

Abstract

Benito Arruñada finds evidence of a distinct Protestant social ethic in the ISSP’s 1998 Religion II Survey (Economic Journal 2010; 120: 890-918). We replicate Arruñada’s results using his broad definition of Protestantism and our new narrow definition, which includes only those ascetic denominations that Max Weber singled out for possessing a strong capitalist work ethic. We then extend this analysis to the ISSP’s 2008 Religion III Survey, the most recent comparable international questionnaire on religious attitudes and religious change. We find no evidence of a Calvinist work ethic, and suggest that Arruñada’s Protestant social ethic continues into the twenty-first century.

Suggested Citation

  • Christopher L. Colvin & Matthew McCracken, 2016. "Work Ethic, Social Ethic, No Ethic: Measuring the Economic Values of Modern Christians," Economics Working Papers 16-06, Queen's Management School, Queen's University Belfast.
  • Handle: RePEc:qub:wpaper:1606
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    Cited by:

    1. Benito Arruñada & Matthias Krapf, 2018. "Religion and the European Union," Economics Working Papers 1601, Department of Economics and Business, Universitat Pompeu Fabra, revised Jun 2018.
    2. Adrian Chadi & Matthias Krapf, 2017. "The Protestant Fiscal Ethic: Religious Confession And Euro Skepticism In Germany," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 55(4), pages 1813-1832, October.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Work Ethic; Social Ethic; International Social Survey Programme; Replication;

    JEL classification:

    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • Z12 - Other Special Topics - - Cultural Economics - - - Religion

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