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Fluctuations in renewable electricity supply: Gains from international trade through infrastructure?

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  • Ziesemer, Thomas

    () (UNU-MERIT, and SBE, Maastricht University)

Abstract

113 countries report producing electricity from non-hydro renewable sources and thereby participate in the global energy transition. This paper shows through a dynamic panel data analysis that imports of electric currents have increased and exports have decreased through the higher share of renewables in electricity production, controlling for other factors. On the one hand more cables have been built recently; but on the other hand some countries are blocking electricity shocks technologically as they suffer from free trade temporarily when receiving supply shocks. This shows that trade currently helps dealing with fluctuations of supply, but temporary losses for recipients of shocks may require payments to leave the borders open.

Suggested Citation

  • Ziesemer, Thomas, 2018. "Fluctuations in renewable electricity supply: Gains from international trade through infrastructure?," MERIT Working Papers 014, United Nations University - Maastricht Economic and Social Research Institute on Innovation and Technology (MERIT).
  • Handle: RePEc:unm:unumer:2018014
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    File URL: https://www.merit.unu.edu/publications/wppdf/2018/wp2018-014.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    6. Karel Janda & Jan Malek & Lukas Recka, 2017. "Influence of Renewable Energy Sources on Electricity Transmission Networks in Central Europe," Working Papers IES 2017/05, Charles University Prague, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute of Economic Studies, revised Feb 2017.
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    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Gains from trade; electric current; gravity; infrastructure; renewables; fluctuations; electricity supply; electricity shocks;

    JEL classification:

    • F14 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Empirical Studies of Trade
    • F15 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Economic Integration
    • F18 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Trade and Environment
    • F59 - International Economics - - International Relations, National Security, and International Political Economy - - - Other
    • H54 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - Infrastructures
    • O33 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Technological Change: Choices and Consequences; Diffusion Processes

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