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The impact of quantitative easing in the Netherlands: A stock-flow consistent approach

Author

Listed:
  • Meijers, Huub

    () (UNU-MERIT, and SBE, Maastricht University)

  • Muysken, Joan

    () (UNU-MERIT, CofFEE-Europe and SBE, Maastricht University)

Abstract

The Netherlands is a prosperous, small open economy with a large financial sector and a trade balance surplus. Current observations suggest that the quantitative easing (QE) initiated by the ECB has a strong impact on the financial sector and international capital flows, while the impact on economic growth is relatively weak in the Netherlands. We analyse these stylised facts using the stock-flow consistent (SFC) approach which builds on earlier work. We develop an open economy SFC model for the Netherlands with an elaborated financial sector, including pension funds which invest to a large extent abroad, and recognise that firms invest a considerable part of their financial assets abroad. This enables us to explain that the direct effects of QE are relatively small due to substantial foreign selling of Dutch government bonds and recapitalisations of the financial sector. The indirect effects of QE are much stronger. They influence the economy through low interest rates and exchange rate appreciation, but have unintended consequences through increased housing prices and asset prices - the latter two are endogenous in our model. We calibrate the model to mimic the observed stylised facts for the Netherlands and perform some policy experiments

Suggested Citation

  • Meijers, Huub & Muysken, Joan, 2016. "The impact of quantitative easing in the Netherlands: A stock-flow consistent approach," MERIT Working Papers 2016-067, United Nations University - Maastricht Economic and Social Research Institute on Innovation and Technology (MERIT).
  • Handle: RePEc:unm:unumer:2016067
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Valiante, Diego, 2015. "The ‘visible hand’ of the ECB’s quantitative easing," CEPS Papers 10611, Centre for European Policy Studies.
    2. Meijers, Huub & Muysken, Joan & Sleijpen, Olaf, 2015. "Firms' excess savings and the Dutch current account surplus: a stock-flow consistent approach," MERIT Working Papers 2015-040, United Nations University - Maastricht Economic and Social Research Institute on Innovation and Technology (MERIT).
    3. Huub Meijers & Joan Muysken & Olaf Sleijpen, 2015. "The deposit financing gap: another Dutch disease," European Journal of Economics and Economic Policies: Intervention, Edward Elgar Publishing, vol. 12(1), pages 32-50, April.
    4. Gennaro Zezza, 2008. "U.S. growth, the housing market, and the distribution of income," Journal of Post Keynesian Economics, M.E. Sharpe, Inc., vol. 30(3), pages 375-401, April.
    5. William Mitchell, 2015. "Eurozone Dystopia," Books, Edward Elgar Publishing, number 16478.
    6. De Grauwe, Paul & Ji, Yuemei, 2013. "Self-fulfilling crises in the Eurozone: An empirical test," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 34(C), pages 15-36.
    7. Dunne, Peter & Everett, Mary & Stuart, Rebecca, 2015. "The Expanded Asset Purchase Programme – What, Why and How of Euro Area QE," Quarterly Bulletin Articles, Central Bank of Ireland, pages 61-71, July.
    8. Klaus-Jürgen Gern & Nils Jannsen & Stefan Kooths & Maik Wolters, 2015. "Quantitative Easing in the Euro Area: Transmission Channels and Risks," Intereconomics: Review of European Economic Policy, Springer;ZBW - Leibniz Information Centre for Economics;Centre for European Policy Studies (CEPS), vol. 50(4), pages 206-212, July.
    9. Janko Cizel & Jon Frost & Aerdt Houben & Peter Wierts, 2019. "Effective Macroprudential Policy: Cross‐Sector Substitution from Price and Quantity Measures," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 51(5), pages 1209-1235, August.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    stock-flow consistent modelling; quantitative easing; current account surplus;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • E44 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Financial Markets and the Macroeconomy
    • B5 - Schools of Economic Thought and Methodology - - Current Heterodox Approaches
    • E6 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Macroeconomic Policy, Macroeconomic Aspects of Public Finance, and General Outlook
    • F45 - International Economics - - Macroeconomic Aspects of International Trade and Finance - - - Macroeconomic Issues of Monetary Unions
    • G21 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Banks; Other Depository Institutions; Micro Finance Institutions; Mortgages
    • G32 - Financial Economics - - Corporate Finance and Governance - - - Financing Policy; Financial Risk and Risk Management; Capital and Ownership Structure; Value of Firms; Goodwill
    • O16 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Financial Markets; Saving and Capital Investment; Corporate Finance and Governance

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