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The geographic dimensions of institutions

Listed author(s):
  • Bhupatiraju S.

    (UNU-MERIT)

In this paper we examine the role of institutions relative to economic performance, absolute geography and financial performance of a country. In order to do this, we use the spatial principal component analysis and a spatial canonical correlation analysis to obtain multi-dimensional measure of institutions, economic performance, absolute geography and financial performance of countries. Our analysis shows that the first canonical functions in all the cases give us results that conform to current literature. That is, we find that a higher level of development is correlated to a higher level of institutional quality, deeper financial structure as well as good geography of the Jeffery Sachs variety. From the second canonical functions we find that economic growth is correlated to market steering. We further find that geographic conditions need not define the institutional set up of countries. A similar institutional set up need not result in a similar financial structure in countries. We show that there is a necessity to take spatial interactions with neighbouring countries into account while analysing the relationships between institutions, geography, economic and financial performance of a country. We find that space indeed has a strong influence on the prevailing institutional and economic conditions of countries. While the impact of space on geography is very obvious, we find that it has no bearing on the financial performance of countries.

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File URL: http://pub.maastrichtuniversity.nl/324675be-cb3e-44a2-8a34-0294e5b23f35
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Paper provided by United Nations University - Maastricht Economic and Social Research Institute on Innovation and Technology (MERIT) in its series MERIT Working Papers with number 086.

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Date of creation: 2014
Handle: RePEc:unm:unumer:2014086
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  1. Dani Rodrik & Arvind Subramanian & Francesco Trebbi, 2004. "Institutions Rule: The Primacy of Institutions Over Geography and Integration in Economic Development," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 9(2), pages 131-165, 06.
  2. Chang, Ha-Joon, 2011. "Institutions and economic development: theory, policy and history," Journal of Institutional Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 7(04), pages 473-498, December.
  3. Verspagen, Bart, 2012. "Stylized facts of governance, institutions and economic development. Exploring the institutional profiles database," MERIT Working Papers 036, United Nations University - Maastricht Economic and Social Research Institute on Innovation and Technology (MERIT).
  4. Robert G. King & Ross Levine, 1993. "Finance and Growth: Schumpeter Might Be Right," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 108(3), pages 717-737.
  5. Dollar, David & Kraay, Aart, 2003. "Institutions, trade, and growth : revisiting the evidence," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3004, The World Bank.
  6. Bhupathiraju, Samyukta & Verspagen, Bart & Ziesemer, Thomas, 2013. "Summarizing large spatial datasets: Spatial principal components and spatial canonical correlation," MERIT Working Papers 011, United Nations University - Maastricht Economic and Social Research Institute on Innovation and Technology (MERIT).
  7. Bernard Fingleton & Enrique López-Bazo, 2006. "Empirical growth models with spatial effects," Papers in Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 85(2), pages 177-198, 06.
  8. Easterly, William & Levine, Ross, 2003. "Tropics, germs, and crops: how endowments influence economic development," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 50(1), pages 3-39, January.
  9. Jeffrey D. Sachs, 2003. "Institutions Don't Rule: Direct Effects of Geography on Per Capita Income," NBER Working Papers 9490, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  10. Robert E. Hall & Charles I. Jones, 1999. "Why do Some Countries Produce So Much More Output Per Worker than Others?," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 114(1), pages 83-116.
  11. Bart Verspagen, 2010. "The spatial hierarchy of technological change and economic development in Europe," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 45(1), pages 109-132, August.
  12. Andrew D. Mellinger & Jeffrey D. Sachs & John L. Gallup, 1999. "Climate, Water Navigability, and Economic Development," CID Working Papers 24, Center for International Development at Harvard University.
  13. Chang, Ha-Joon, 2011. "Reply to the comments on ‘Institutions and Economic Development: Theory, Policy and History’," Journal of Institutional Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 7(04), pages 595-613, December.
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