IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/unc/dispap/139.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

How Did Developed Countries Industrialize? The History Of Trade And Industrial Policy: The Cases Of Great Britain And The Usa

Author

Listed:
  • Mehdi SHAFAEDDIN

Abstract

This paper examines the history of trade policy in Great Britain and the United States and also refer to the cases of Germany and France. This paper indicates that it is a fallacy that early industrializers could have developed their industrial sector without infant industry protection. Indeed in all cases, to develop their industries, they went through an infant industry protection phase and heavy government intervention in the foreign sector. Nevertheless, the degree of protection and government intervention varied from one country to another. The United States was the motherland of infant industry protection not only at the intellectual level but also in actual fact. Despite the fact that the Industrial Revolution contributed to the rapid industrialization of Great Britain, its industrial sector benefited from trade protection and other forms of government intervention in the trade flow through the Navigation Act and by means of political power and even military power.

Suggested Citation

  • Mehdi SHAFAEDDIN, 1998. "How Did Developed Countries Industrialize? The History Of Trade And Industrial Policy: The Cases Of Great Britain And The Usa," UNCTAD Discussion Papers 139, United Nations Conference on Trade and Development.
  • Handle: RePEc:unc:dispap:139
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.unctad.org/en/docs/dp_139.en.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Paul BAIROCH & Richard KOZUL-WRIGHT, 1996. "Globalization Myths: Some Historical Reflections On Integration, Industrialization And Growth In The World Economy," UNCTAD Discussion Papers 113, United Nations Conference on Trade and Development.
    2. Erik S. Reinert, 1999. "The role of the state in economic growth," Journal of Economic Studies, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 26(4/5), pages 268-326, September.
    3. Harley, C. Knick, 1992. "International Competitiveness of the Antebellum American Cotton Textile Industry," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 52(03), pages 559-584, September.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Gokhan Yilmaz, 2011. "Resurgence of Selective Industrial Policy: What Turkey Needs," Working Papers 2011/3, Turkish Economic Association.
    2. Shafaeddin, Mehdi, 2010. "Trade liberalization, industrialization and development; experience of recent decades," MPRA Paper 26355, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. S.M. Shafaeddin, 2004. "Who Is The Master? Who Is The Servant? Market Or Government? An Alternative Approach: Towards A Coordination System," UNCTAD Discussion Papers 175, United Nations Conference on Trade and Development.
    4. Josif Iliev, 2014. "The process of reindustrialisation – a strategic challenge to national economy," Economic Thought journal, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences - Economic Research Institute, issue 6, pages 3-14,15-25.
    5. Benhassine, Najy & Raballand, Gaël, 2009. "Beyond ideological cleavages: A unifying framework for industrial policies and other public interventions," Economic Systems, Elsevier, vol. 33(4), pages 293-309, December.
    6. Shafaeddin, Mehdi, 2006. "Does trade openness helps or hinders industrialization?," MPRA Paper 4371, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    7. Pradhan, Jaya Prakash, 2003. "Building Indian Multinationals: Can India ‘Pick Up the Winners’?," MPRA Paper 12403, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    8. Mehdi SHAFAEDDIN, 2000. "What Did Frederick List Actually Say? Some Clarifications On The Infant Industry Argument," UNCTAD Discussion Papers 149, United Nations Conference on Trade and Development.
    9. José E. Cassiolato & Helena M. M. Lastres, 2008. "Discussing innovation and development: Converging points between the Latin American school and the Innovation Systems perspective?," Globelics Working Paper Series 2008-02, Globelics - Global Network for Economics of Learning, Innovation, and Competence Building Systems, Aalborg University, Department of Business and Management.
    10. Shafaeddin, Mehdi, 2009. "Impact of Selectivity and Neutrality of trade Policy Incentives on Industrialization of Developing Countries; Implications for NAMA Negotiations," MPRA Paper 15037, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    11. Shafaeddin, Mehdi, 2006. "Is The Industrial Policy Relevant In The 21st Century?," MPRA Paper 6643, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    12. Srinivas, Smita, 2006. "Industrial Development and Innovation: Some Lessons from Vaccine Procurement," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 34(10), pages 1742-1764, October.

    More about this item

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:unc:dispap:139. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Joerg Mayer). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/unctach.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.