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Industrialization, Exports and the Developmental State in Africa: The Case for Transformation

Author

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  • Mwangi wa Githinji

    () (University of Massachusetts Amherst)

  • Olugbenga Adesida

    () (African Leadership Institute)

Abstract

This essay explores the role of the state in promoting exports and industrialization in the quest for transformation of African economies. It does this by exploring the role of trade in African economies followed by a brief look at the East Asian Developmental state. This is followed by an examination of why many African states have failed at being drivers of transformation. It concludes by examining the potential role of African states in a project of transformation as well as the available avenues and resources for transformation. JEL Categories: O1; O2; O3; N17; N47; N57; N67; N77.

Suggested Citation

  • Mwangi wa Githinji & Olugbenga Adesida, 2011. "Industrialization, Exports and the Developmental State in Africa: The Case for Transformation," UMASS Amherst Economics Working Papers 2011-18, University of Massachusetts Amherst, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:ums:papers:2011-18
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    File URL: http://www.umass.edu/economics/publications/2011-18.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Asongu, Simplice & Nwachukwu, Jacinta, 2016. "Is the Threat of Foreign Aid Withdrawal an Effective Deterrent to Political Oppression? Evidence from 53 African Countries," MPRA Paper 74649, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Amavilah, Voxi & Asongu, Simplice A & Andrés, Antonio R, 2014. "Globalization, Peace & Stability, Governance, and Knowledge Economy," MPRA Paper 58756, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Simplice Asongu & Vanessa Tchamyou, 2015. "Foreign aid, education and lifelong learning in Africa," Working Papers 15/047, African Governance and Development Institute..
    4. Simplice Asongu & Jacinta C Nwachukwu, 2015. "The incremental effect of education on corruption: evidence of synergy from lifelong learning," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 35(4), pages 2288-2308.
    5. Simplice A. Asongu & Jacinta C. Nwachukwu, 2016. "The role of lifelong learning on political stability and non violence: evidence from Africa," Journal of Economic Studies, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 43(1), pages 141-164, January.
    6. Simplice Asongu & Vanessa Tchamyou & Paul Acha-Anyi, 2017. "Who is Who in Knowledge Economy in Africa?," Working Papers 17/043, African Governance and Development Institute..
    7. Simplice A. Asongu, 2017. "The Comparative Economics of Knowledge Economy in Africa: Policy Benchmarks, Syndromes, and Implications," Journal of the Knowledge Economy, Springer;Portland International Center for Management of Engineering and Technology (PICMET), vol. 8(2), pages 596-637, June.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Africa; economic development; economic history; exports; industrialization; transformation; .;

    JEL classification:

    • O1 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development
    • O2 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Development Planning and Policy
    • O3 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights
    • N17 - Economic History - - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics; Industrial Structure; Growth; Fluctuations - - - Africa; Oceania
    • N47 - Economic History - - Government, War, Law, International Relations, and Regulation - - - Africa; Oceania
    • N57 - Economic History - - Agriculture, Natural Resources, Environment and Extractive Industries - - - Africa; Oceania
    • N67 - Economic History - - Manufacturing and Construction - - - Africa; Oceania
    • N77 - Economic History - - Economic History: Transport, International and Domestic Trade, Energy, and Other Services - - - Africa; Oceania

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