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Large-Scale Evaluations of Curricular Effectiveness: The Case of Elementary Mathematics in Indiana

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Abstract

We use data from one of the few states where information on curriculum adoptions is available – Indiana – to empirically evaluate differences in performance across three elementary-mathematics curricula. The three curricula that we evaluate were popular nationally during the time of our study, and two of the three remain popular today. We find large differences in effectiveness between the curricula, most notably between the two that held the largest market shares in Indiana. Both are best-characterized as traditional in pedagogy. We also show that the publisher of the least-effective curriculum did not lose market share in Indiana in the following adoption cycle; one explanation is that educational decision makers lack information about differences in curricular effectiveness.

Suggested Citation

  • Cory Koedel & Rachana Bhatt, 2011. "Large-Scale Evaluations of Curricular Effectiveness: The Case of Elementary Mathematics in Indiana," Working Papers 1122, Department of Economics, University of Missouri, revised 31 Jan 2012.
  • Handle: RePEc:umc:wpaper:1122
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    File URL: https://economics.missouri.edu/working-papers/2011/wp1122_koedel.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Bhatt, Rachana & Koedel, Cory & Lehmann, Douglas, 2013. "Is curriculum quality uniform? Evidence from Florida," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 34(C), pages 107-121.
    2. Kim, Dongwoo & Koedel, Cory & Ni, Shawn & Podgursky, Michael, 2017. "Labor market frictions and production efficiency in public schools," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 60(C), pages 54-67.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    curricular effectiveness; math curricula; non-experimental methods; matching methods; education policy;

    JEL classification:

    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education
    • I28 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Government Policy
    • H75 - Public Economics - - State and Local Government; Intergovernmental Relations - - - State and Local Government: Health, Education, and Welfare

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