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Africa’s Debt: Who Owes Whom?

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  • Léonce Ndikumana
  • James Boyce

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  • Léonce Ndikumana & James Boyce, 2002. "Africa’s Debt: Who Owes Whom?," Working Papers wp48, Political Economy Research Institute, University of Massachusetts at Amherst.
  • Handle: RePEc:uma:periwp:wp48
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    File URL: https://per.umass.edu/fileadmin/pdf/working_papers/working_papers_1-50/WP48.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. World Bank, 2002. "World Development Indicators 2002," World Bank Publications - Books, The World Bank Group, number 13921.
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    Cited by:

    1. James Boyce, 2003. "Aid, Conditionality, and War Economies," Working Papers wp70, Political Economy Research Institute, University of Massachusetts at Amherst.
    2. James K. Boyce, 2004. "Aid, Conditionality, and War Economies," UMASS Amherst Economics Working Papers 2004-05, University of Massachusetts Amherst, Department of Economics.
    3. Léonce Ndikumana, 2006. "Corruption and Pro-Poor Growth Outcomes: Evidence and Lessons for African Countries," Working Papers wp120, Political Economy Research Institute, University of Massachusetts at Amherst.
    4. Beja, Jr., Edsel, 2009. "The Philippines on debt row," MPRA Paper 16553, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. Jonathan Di John, 2006. "The Political Economy of Taxation and Tax Reform in Developing Countries," WIDER Working Paper Series RP2006-74, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).

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