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Post-Crisis Capital Account Regulation in South Korea and South Africa

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  • Brittany Baumann
  • Kevin Gallagher

Abstract

In the immediate aftermath of the global financial crisis, the world economy was characterized as experiencing a ‘two-speed’ recovery. Industrialized nations, where the crisis occurred, saw slow growth whereas many emerging market and developing countries grew significantly. These growth differentials, coupled with significant interest rate differentials across the globe, triggered significant flows of financial capital to the emerging market and developing countries. As a result, many countries experienced sharp appreciations of their currencies and associated concerns about the development of asset bubbles. This paper examines measures taken to mitigate the harmful effects of excessive capital flows in South Korea and South Africa. Each of these nations experienced similar surges in inflows with associated exchange rate and asset bubble woes, but each took quite different approaches in an attempt to mitigate those effects. South Korea devised a series of capital account regulations on the inflow of capital whereas South Africa liberalized their existing regulations on capital outflows. We econometrically analyze the effectiveness of these measures and find some limited evidence that both countries’ measures were successful in lessening the appreciation and volatility of their exchanges rates. These nations were less successful in stemming asset bubbles.

Suggested Citation

  • Brittany Baumann & Kevin Gallagher, 2013. "Post-Crisis Capital Account Regulation in South Korea and South Africa," Working Papers wp320, Political Economy Research Institute, University of Massachusetts at Amherst.
  • Handle: RePEc:uma:periwp:wp320
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    File URL: https://www.peri.umass.edu/fileadmin/pdf/working_papers/working_papers_301-350/WP320.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Calderon, Cesar & Kubota, Megumi, 2012. "Gross inflows gone wild : gross capital inflows, credit booms and crises," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6270, The World Bank.
    2. Chamon, Marcos & Garcia, Márcio, 2016. "Capital controls in Brazil: Effective?," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 61(C), pages 163-187.
    3. Joshua Aizenman & Yothin Jinjarak & Donghyun Park, 2013. "Capital Flows and Economic Growth in the Era of Financial Integration and Crisis, 1990–2010," Open Economies Review, Springer, vol. 24(3), pages 371-396, July.
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    Cited by:

    1. Barbara Fritz & Daniela Prates, 2013. "Beyond capital controls: the regulation of foreign currency derivatives markets in South Korea and Brazil after the global financial crisis," Competence Centre on Money, Trade, Finance and Development 1307, Hochschule fuer Technik und Wirtschaft, Berlin.
    2. Prates, Daniela Magalhães & Fritz, Barbara, 2016. "Beyond capital controls: regulation of foreign currency derivatives markets in the Republic of Korea and Brazil after the global financial crisis," Revista CEPAL, Naciones Unidas Comisión Económica para América Latina y el Caribe (CEPAL), April.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • E65 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Macroeconomic Policy, Macroeconomic Aspects of Public Finance, and General Outlook - - - Studies of Particular Policy Episodes
    • F32 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - Current Account Adjustment; Short-term Capital Movements
    • F36 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - Financial Aspects of Economic Integration
    • F41 - International Economics - - Macroeconomic Aspects of International Trade and Finance - - - Open Economy Macroeconomics

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