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Percepciones sobre Movilidad Social y Meritocracia: Un Estudio para Chile Usando la Encuesta de Trabajo y Equidad

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  • Óscar Landerretche
  • Nicolás Lillo

Abstract

Este trabajo es un estudio sobre las correlaciones existentes entre la percepción de movilidad social y la creencia de la existencia de meritocracia en Chile. Los resultados muestran que la movilidad social intergeneracional que experimenta un individuo está positiva y significativamente correlacionada con la probabilidad de que dicho individuo atribuya la pobreza a características individuales de las personas, lo cual indica creencia en la existencia de meritocracia. Además, se encuentra evidencia de que los años de educación están negativamente correlacionados con esta creencia mientras que la edad está positivamente correlacionada. Un resultado importante es que la magnitud de la correlación entre movilidad social y la creencia en la existencia de meritocracia domina a todas las otras correlaciones.

Suggested Citation

  • Óscar Landerretche & Nicolás Lillo, 2011. "Percepciones sobre Movilidad Social y Meritocracia: Un Estudio para Chile Usando la Encuesta de Trabajo y Equidad," Working Papers wp331, University of Chile, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:udc:wpaper:wp331
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