IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/
MyIDEAS: Login to save this article or follow this journal

Class discrimination and meritocracy in the labor market: evidence from Chile

  • Javier Núnez
  • Roberto Gutiérrez

    ()

This paper studies class discrimination and meritocracy in the Chilean labor market. Employing a dataset rich in productivity and class measures, we find that upper-class professionals earn approximately 50 per cent more than those raised in lower socioeconomic backgrounds. This gap is unrelated to differences in academic performance at university, second language proficiency, postgraduate studies, schools’ academic quality, geographic origin and other standard controls, which suggests some employer discrimination. This gap is larger than gaps reported elsewhere for gender, race and physical appearance. Meritocracy is modest, as the effect of socioeconomic background on earnings outweighs that of academic performance at university.

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.

File URL: http://www.econ.uchile.cl/uploads/publicacion/6f998f18-0904-4997-acab-5545340ca62b.pdf
Download Restriction: no

Article provided by University of Chile, Department of Economics in its journal Estudios de Economia.

Volume (Year): 31 (2004)
Issue (Month): 2 Year 2004 (December)
Pages: 113-132

as
in new window

Handle: RePEc:udc:esteco:v:31:y:2004:i:2:p:113-132
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.econ.uchile.cl/

More information through EDIRC

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:

as in new window
  1. Lawrence M. Kahn, 1992. "The Effects of Race on Professional Football Players' Compensation," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 45(2), pages 295-310, January.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:udc:esteco:v:31:y:2004:i:2:p:113-132. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Verónica Kunze)

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.