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Learning from the Chilean Experience: The Determinants of Pension Switching

Author

Listed:
  • David Bravo Urrutia
  • Olivia S. Mitchell
  • Petra Todd

Abstract

Competition across money managers, along with market entry, in theory could ensure that capital market remains competitive. But in Chile, which has had a privatized pension system for 25 years, high rates of switching between the funds and little downward movement on fees, have been interpreted as evidence of market inefficiency. This chapter uses a change in the regulatory rules governing the marketing of AFP pensions (Administradoras de Fondos de Pensiones) in Chile to investigate the empirical basis for sources of market frictions. We find that switching patterns are on a par with trading in US 401(k) accounts, and further, that switchers tend to be highly educated and relatively more highly paid. Switching is also more common among those with higher levels of financial literacy. The 1997 regulatory change appears to have reduced switching, particularly among the better educated.

Suggested Citation

  • David Bravo Urrutia & Olivia S. Mitchell & Petra Todd, 2007. "Learning from the Chilean Experience: The Determinants of Pension Switching," Working Papers wp266, University of Chile, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:udc:wpaper:wp266
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    File URL: http://www.econ.uchile.cl/uploads/publicacion/e1de3a5d-ad4e-48e7-b528-afad6e629173.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Lusardi, Annamaria & Mitchell, Olivia S., 2007. "Baby Boomer retirement security: The roles of planning, financial literacy, and housing wealth," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 54(1), pages 205-224, January.
    2. Iván Marinovic & Salvador Valdés, 2010. "La demanda de las AFP chilenas: 1993-2002," Documentos de Trabajo 369, Instituto de Economia. Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile..
    3. Annamaria Lusardi & Olivia S. Mitchell, 2005. "Financial Literacy and Planning: Implications for Retirement Wellbeing," CeRP Working Papers 46, Center for Research on Pensions and Welfare Policies, Turin (Italy).
    4. Alberto Arenas de Mesa & Jere Behrman & David Bravo, 2001. "Characteristics of and determinants of the density of contributions in a Private Social Security System," Working Papers wp077, University of Michigan, Michigan Retirement Research Center.
    5. Solange Berstein Jáuregui & Carolina Cabrita Felix, 2007. "Los determinantes de la elección de AFP en Chile: nueva evidencia a partir de datos individuales," Estudios de Economia, University of Chile, Department of Economics, vol. 34(1 Year 20), pages 53-72, June.
    6. Olivia S. Mitchell & Gary R. Mottola & Stephen P. Utkus & Takeshi Yamaguchi, 2006. "The Inattentive Participant: Portfolio Trading Behavior in 401(k) Plans," Working Papers wp115, University of Michigan, Michigan Retirement Research Center.
    7. Rodrigo Cerda, 2006. "Movilidad en la Cartera de Cotizantes por AFP: La Importancia de ser Primero en Rentabilidad," Documentos de Trabajo 309, Instituto de Economia. Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile..
    8. Alberto Arenas de Mesa & David Bravo & Jere R. Behrman & Olivia S. Mitchell & Petra E. Todd, 2006. "The Chilean Pension Reform Turns 25: Lessons From the Social Protection Survey," NBER Working Papers 12401, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    9. Solange Berstein & Alejandro Micco, 2002. "Turnover and Regulation: The Chilean Pension Fund Industry," Working Papers Central Bank of Chile 180, Central Bank of Chile.
    10. John F. Cogan & Olivia S. Mitchell, 2003. "Perspectives from the President's Commission on Social Security Reform," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 17(2), pages 149-172, Spring.
    11. Takeshi Yamaguchi & Olivia Mitchell & Gary Mottola & Steven Utkus, 2007. "Winners and Losers: 401(k) Trading and Portfolio Performance," Working Papers wp154, University of Michigan, Michigan Retirement Research Center.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Justine Hastings & Olivia S. Mitchell, 2010. "How Financial Literacy and Impatience Shape Retirement Wealth and Investment Behaviors," Working Papers wp233, University of Michigan, Michigan Retirement Research Center.
    2. Jere R. Behrman & Olivia S. Mitchell & Cindy Soo & David Bravo, 2010. "Financial Literacy, Schooling, and Wealth Accumulation," NBER Working Papers 16452, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Annamaria Lusardi & Olivia S. Mitchell & Vilsa Curto, 2012. "Financial Sophistication in the Older Population," NBER Working Papers 17863, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Annamaria Lusardi & Olivia S. Mitchell & Vilsa Curto, 2009. "Financial Literacy and Financial Sophistication Among Older Americans," NBER Working Papers 15469, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Mantilla, Cesar, 2014. "Financial literacy in Colombia seen through the lens of the interest rate bias," IAST Working Papers 14-12, Institute for Advanced Study in Toulouse (IAST).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Pension; AFP; Chilean labor market.;

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