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Bank globalization and the balance sheet channel of monetary transmission

Author

Listed:
  • Sami Alpanda

    (Amherst College)

  • Uluc Aysun

    (University of Connecticut)

Abstract

The literature typically finds that the development of financial markets has decreased the ability of central banks to affect the real economy. This paper shows that this negative relationship does not hold for the balance sheet channel of monetary transmission and bank globalization -- one aspect of financial development. The reason is that global banks are more sensitive to borrowers' leverage. By affecting this leverage, monetary policy has a larger impact on global banks' lending and aggregate economic activity. We use bank-level, Call Report data to obtain this disparity between more and less global banks. We then use this data in the estimation of a general equilibrium model and find that the balance sheet channel of monetary policy operates mainly through more global banks.

Suggested Citation

  • Sami Alpanda & Uluc Aysun, 2010. "Bank globalization and the balance sheet channel of monetary transmission," Working papers 2010-20, University of Connecticut, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:uct:uconnp:2010-20
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Ashcraft, Adam B. & Campello, Murillo, 2007. "Firm balance sheets and monetary policy transmission," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 54(6), pages 1515-1528, September.
    2. Nicola Cetorelli & Linda S. Goldberg, 2008. "Banking globalization, monetary transmission, and the lending channel," Staff Reports 333, Federal Reserve Bank of New York.
    3. Sami Alpanda & Adrian Peralta-Alva, 2010. "Oil Crisis, Energy-Saving Technological Change and the Stock Market Crash of 1973-74," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 13(4), pages 824-842, October.
    4. Jeremy C. Stein & Anil K. Kashyap, 2000. "What Do a Million Observations on Banks Say about the Transmission of Monetary Policy?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 90(3), pages 407-428, June.
    5. Gawande, Kishore, 1997. "Generated regressors in linear and nonlinear models," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 54(2), pages 119-126, February.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    balance sheet channel; bank globalization; financial accelerator;

    JEL classification:

    • E44 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Financial Markets and the Macroeconomy
    • F31 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - Foreign Exchange
    • F41 - International Economics - - Macroeconomic Aspects of International Trade and Finance - - - Open Economy Macroeconomics
    • O16 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Financial Markets; Saving and Capital Investment; Corporate Finance and Governance

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