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Indeterminacy with Progressive Taxation and Sector-Specific Externalities

Author

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  • Jang-Ting Guo

    () (Department of Economics, University of California Riverside)

  • Sharon G. Harrison

    (Barnard College, Columbia University)

Abstract

This paper quantitatively examines the empirical plausibility of equilibrium indeterminacy and sunspot-driven cyclical fluctuations in a real business cycle model with two distinct production sectors that yield consumption and investment goods, together with separable or non-separable preferences. When calibrated to match the observed progressivity of the U.S. federal individual income tax schedule, each version of our model economy exhibits an indeterminate steady state under empirically realistic combinations of the household's labor supply elasticity and the degree of productive externalities in the investment goods sector. Therefore, macroeconomic instability due to agents' self-fulfilling expectations may in fact be a prevalent feature of the U.S.

Suggested Citation

  • Jang-Ting Guo & Sharon G. Harrison, 2014. "Indeterminacy with Progressive Taxation and Sector-Specific Externalities," Working Papers 201403, University of California at Riverside, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:ucr:wpaper:201403
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Guo, Jang-Ting & Harrison, Sharon G., 2010. "Indeterminacy with no-income-effect preferences and sector-specific externalities," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 145(1), pages 287-300, January.
    2. Jang-Ting Guo & Sharon G. Harrison, 2001. "Tax Policy and Stability in a Model with Sector-Specific Externalities," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 4(1), pages 75-89, January.
    3. Hansen, Gary D., 1985. "Indivisible labor and the business cycle," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 16(3), pages 309-327, November.
    4. Benhabib Jess & Farmer Roger E. A., 1994. "Indeterminacy and Increasing Returns," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 63(1), pages 19-41, June.
    5. Chen, Shu-Hua & Guo, Jang-Ting, 2013. "Progressive taxation and macroeconomic (In) stability with productive government spending," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 37(5), pages 951-963.
    6. Benhabib, Jess & Farmer, Roger E. A., 1996. "Indeterminacy and sector-specific externalities," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 37(3), pages 421-443, June.
    7. Garnier, Jean-Philippe & Nishimura, Kazuo & Venditti, Alain, 2013. "Local Indeterminacy In Continuous-Time Models: The Role Of Returns To Scale," Macroeconomic Dynamics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 17(02), pages 326-355, March.
    8. Guo, Jang-Ting & Lansing, Kevin J., 1998. "Indeterminacy and Stabilization Policy," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 82(2), pages 481-490, October.
    9. Raj Chetty & Adam Guren & Day Manoli & Andrea Weber, 2013. "Does Indivisible Labor Explain the Difference between Micro and Macro Elasticities? A Meta-Analysis of Extensive Margin Elasticities," NBER Macroeconomics Annual, University of Chicago Press, vol. 27(1), pages 1-56.
    10. Sharon G. Harrison, 2003. "Returns to Scale and Externalities in the Consumption and Investment Sectors," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 6(4), pages 963-976, October.
    11. Huang, Kevin X.D. & Meng, Qinglai, 2012. "Increasing returns and unsynchronized wage adjustment in sunspot models of the business cycle," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 147(1), pages 284-309.
    12. Rogerson, Richard, 1988. "Indivisible labor, lotteries and equilibrium," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 21(1), pages 3-16, January.
    13. Steven P. Cassou & Kevin J. Lansing, 2004. "Growth Effects of Shifting from a Graduated-rate Tax System to a Flat Tax," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 42(2), pages 194-213, April.
    14. Nishimura, Kazuo & Venditti, Alain, 2010. "Indeterminacy and expectation-driven fluctuations with non-separable preferences," Mathematical Social Sciences, Elsevier, vol. 60(1), pages 46-56, July.
    15. Jean-Philippe Garnier & Kazuo Nishimura & Alain Venditti, 2007. "Intertemporal substitution in consumption, labor supply elasticity and sunspot fluctuations in continuous-time models," International Journal of Economic Theory, The International Society for Economic Theory, vol. 3(4), pages 235-259.
    16. Jaimovich, Nir, 2008. "Income effects and indeterminacy in a calibrated one-sector growth model," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 143(1), pages 610-623, November.
    17. Meng, Qinglai & Yip, Chong Kee, 2008. "On indeterminacy in one-sector models of the business cycle with factor-generated externalities," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 30(1), pages 97-110, March.
    18. Farmer Roger E. A. & Guo Jang-Ting, 1994. "Real Business Cycles and the Animal Spirits Hypothesis," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 63(1), pages 42-72, June.
    19. Raj Chetty & Adam Guren & Day Manoli & Andrea Weber, 2011. "Are Micro and Macro Labor Supply Elasticities Consistent? A Review of Evidence on the Intensive and Extensive Margins," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 101(3), pages 471-475, May.
    20. Weder, Mark, 2000. "Animal spirits, technology shocks and the business cycle," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 24(2), pages 273-295, February.
    21. Harrison, Sharon G., 2001. "Indeterminacy in a model with sector-specific externalities," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 25(5), pages 747-764, May.
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    Cited by:

    1. Jang-Ting Guo & Juin-Jen Chang & Jhy-Yuan Shieh & Wei-Neng Wang, 2017. "Sectoral Composition of Government Spending, Distortionary Income Taxation, and Macroeconomic (In)stabilit," Working Papers 201702, University of California at Riverside, Department of Economics.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Indeterminacy; Progressive Taxation; Sector-Specific Externalities.;

    JEL classification:

    • E30 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - General (includes Measurement and Data)
    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles
    • E62 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Macroeconomic Policy, Macroeconomic Aspects of Public Finance, and General Outlook - - - Fiscal Policy

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