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Improved errors-in-variables estimators for grouped data

  • Paul J. Devereux

Grouping models are widely used in economics but are subject to finite sample bias. I show that the standard errors-in-variables estimator (EVE) is exactly equivalent to the Jackknife Instrumental Variables Estimator (JIVE), and use this relationship to develop an estimator which, unlike EVE, is unbiased in finite samples. The theoretical results are demonstrated using Monte Carlo experiments. Finally, I implement a model of intertemporal male labor supply using microdata from the United States Census. There are sizeable differences in the wage elasticity across estimators, showing the practical importance of the theoretical issues even when the sample size is quite large.

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File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10197/748
File Function: First version, 2006
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Paper provided by School of Economics, University College Dublin in its series Working Papers with number 200602.

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Date of creation: Jan 2006
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Handle: RePEc:ucn:wpaper:200602
Contact details of provider: Postal: UCD, Belfield, Dublin 4
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Web page: http://www.ucd.ie/economics

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  1. Dolores Collado, M., 1997. "Estimating dynamic models from time series of independent cross-sections," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 82(1), pages 37-62.
  2. Donald, Stephen G & Newey, Whitney K, 2001. "Choosing the Number of Instruments," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 69(5), pages 1161-91, September.
  3. Paul J. Devereux, 2006. "Small sample bias in synthetic cohort models of labor supply," Working Papers 200606, School of Economics, University College Dublin.
  4. Paul J. Devereux & Daniel A. Ackerberg, 2008. "Improved Jive estimators for overidentified linear models with and without heteroskedasticity," Working Papers 200817, School of Economics, University College Dublin.
  5. Angrist, J D & Imbens, G W & Krueger, A B, 1999. "Jackknife Instrumental Variables Estimation," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 14(1), pages 57-67, Jan.-Feb..
  6. Daron Acemoglu & Jorn-Steffen Pischke, 2000. "Changes in the Wage Structure, Family Income, and Children's Education," NBER Working Papers 7986, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  7. Angrist, Joshua D, 1990. "Lifetime Earnings and the Vietnam Era Draft Lottery: Evidence from Social Security Administrative Records," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 80(3), pages 313-36, June.
  8. David J. McKenzie, 2001. "Consumption Growth in a Booming Economy: Taiwan 1976-96," Working Papers 823, Economic Growth Center, Yale University.
  9. Deaton, Angus, 1985. "Panel data from time series of cross-sections," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 30(1-2), pages 109-126.
  10. Joshua D. Angrist & Alan B. Krueger, 1990. "Does Compulsory School Attendance Affect Schooling and Earnings?," NBER Working Papers 3572, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  11. Paul J. Devereux, 2004. "Changes in Relative Wages and Family Labor Supply," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 39(3).
  12. Phillips, Garry D A & Hale, C, 1977. "The Bias of Instrumental Variable Estimators of Simultaneous Equation Systems," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 18(1), pages 219-28, February.
  13. Nijman, T.E. & Verbeek, M.J.C.M., 1993. "Minimum MSE estimation of a regression model with fixed effects from a series of cross sections," Other publications TiSEM 34c1104a-a64b-4030-be99-b, Tilburg University, School of Economics and Management.
  14. Browning, Martin & Deaton, Angus & Irish, Margaret, 1985. "A Profitable Approach to Labor Supply and Commodity Demands over the Life-Cycle," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 53(3), pages 503-43, May.
  15. Angrist, Joshua D., 1991. "Grouped-data estimation and testing in simple labor-supply models," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 47(2-3), pages 243-266, February.
  16. David Card & Thomas Lemieux, 1993. "Wage Dispersion, Returns to Skill, and Black-White Wage Differentials," Working Papers 691, Princeton University, Department of Economics, Industrial Relations Section..
  17. Douglas Staiger & James H. Stock, 1997. "Instrumental Variables Regression with Weak Instruments," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 65(3), pages 557-586, May.
  18. Verbeek, M. & Nijman, T., 1992. "Minimum MSE Estimatin of a Regression Model with Fixed Effects from a Series of Cross Sections," Papers 9201, Tilburg - Center for Economic Research.
  19. Richard Blundell & Alan Duncan & Costas Meghir, 1998. "Estimating Labor Supply Responses Using Tax Reforms," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 66(4), pages 827-862, July.
  20. Nathalie Greenan & Jacques Mairesse, 1999. "Using Employee Level Data in a Firm Level Econometric Study," CIRANO Working Papers 99s-12, CIRANO.
  21. Joseph Altonji, 1984. "Intertemporal Substitution in Labor Supply: Evidence from Micro Data," Working Papers 562, Princeton University, Department of Economics, Industrial Relations Section..
  22. Blomquist, Soren & Dahlberg, Matz, 1999. "Small Sample Properties of LIML and Jackknife IV Estimators: Experiments with Weak Instruments," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 14(1), pages 69-88, Jan.-Feb..
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