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Hazard Model Analysis of Community College Outcomes

Author

Listed:
  • Darshak Patel

    (Department of Economics, University of Kentucky)

  • Christopher Jepsen

    (School of Economics, University College Dublin)

Abstract

Community colleges serve a diverse set of students, from recent immigrants studying for citizenship tests to students looking to transfer to four-year institutions. Relative to continuous enrollment, the three most common outcomes for students are to graduate, transfer to a four-year institution, or drop out without either of the previous two outcomes. We use a competing-risks hazard model to jointly model the determinants of these three outcomes for Kentucky two-year college students. Our results highlight the importance of multiple factors such as working while enrolled, financial aid, demographics, and having a GED.

Suggested Citation

  • Darshak Patel & Christopher Jepsen, 2018. "Hazard Model Analysis of Community College Outcomes," Working Papers 201823, Geary Institute, University College Dublin.
  • Handle: RePEc:ucd:wpaper:201823
    as

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    File URL: http://www.ucd.ie/geary/static/publications/workingpapers/gearywp201823.pdf
    File Function: First version, 2018
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Stratton, Leslie S. & O'Toole, Dennis M. & Wetzel, James N., 2008. "A multinomial logit model of college stopout and dropout behavior," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 27(3), pages 319-331, June.
    2. Cameron, Stephen V & Heckman, James J, 1993. "The Nonequivalence of High School Equivalents," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 11(1), pages 1-47, January.
    3. Surette, Brian J., 2001. "Transfer from two-year to four-year college: an analysis of gender differences," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 20(2), pages 151-163, April.
    4. DesJardins, Stephen L. & Ahlburg, Dennis A. & McCall, Brian P., 2006. "The effects of interrupted enrollment on graduation from college: Racial, income, and ability differences," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 25(6), pages 575-590, December.
    5. Julian R. Betts & Laurel L. McFarland, 1995. "Safe Port in a Storm: The Impact of Labor Market Conditions on Community College Enrollments," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 30(4), pages 741-765.
    6. DesJardins, S. L. & Ahlburg, D. A. & McCall, B. P., 1999. "An event history model of student departure," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 18(3), pages 375-390, June.
    7. Marc A. Scott & Benjamin B. Kennedy, 2005. "Pitfalls in Pathways: Some Perspectives on Competing Risks Event History Analysis in Education Research," Journal of Educational and Behavioral Statistics, , vol. 30(4), pages 413-442, December.
    8. Burton A. Weisbrod, 1962. "Education and Investment in Human Capital," NBER Chapters, in: Investment in Human Beings, pages 106-123, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    9. Burton A. Weisbrod, 1962. "Education and Investment in Human Capital," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 70, pages 106-106.
    10. Doyle, William R., 2009. "The effect of community college enrollment on bachelor's degree completion," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 28(2), pages 199-206, April.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Education; Hazard Models; Two-Year Colleges; Competing-Risks;

    JEL classification:

    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education
    • C41 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods: Special Topics - - - Duration Analysis; Optimal Timing Strategies
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity

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