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Commitment to Equity Assessment (CEQ) A Diagnostic Framework to Assess Governments' Fiscal Policies Handbook

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  • Nora Lustig

    (Department of Economics, Tulane University)

Abstract

Fiscal policy can change poverty and inequality substantially or little depending on the government's redistributive effort. We develop a diagnostic framework to assess how aligned fiscal policies are with supporting a minimum living standard and human capital accumulation, as well as reducing inequality. The Commitment to Equity Assessment (CEQ) evaluates efforts based on whether governments: i. collect and allocate enough resources to support a minimum living standard for all; ii. collect and distribute resources equitably; iii. ensure spending is fiscally sustainable and that programs are of good quality and incentive compatible; iv. collect and publish relevant information as well as are subject to independent evaluations. The CEQ relies on inequality, poverty and tax and benefit incidence analyses.

Suggested Citation

  • Nora Lustig, 2011. "Commitment to Equity Assessment (CEQ) A Diagnostic Framework to Assess Governments' Fiscal Policies Handbook," Working Papers 1119, Tulane University, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:tul:wpaper:1119
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Nora Lustig, 2011. "Fiscal policy and income redistribution in Latin America: Challenging the conventional wisdom," Working Papers 227, ECINEQ, Society for the Study of Economic Inequality.
    2. Nora Lustig, 2011. "The Knowledge Bank and Poverty Reduction," Working Papers 1111, Tulane University, Department of Economics.
    3. Pablo Sauma & Juan Diego Trejos, 2014. "Universidad de Costa Rica," Commitment to Equity (CEQ) Working Paper Series 1318E, Tulane University, Department of Economics.
    4. Pablo Sauma & Juan Diego Trejos, 2014. "Universidad de Costa Rica," Commitment to Equity (CEQ) Working Paper Series 18E, Tulane University, Department of Economics.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    poverty; inequality; fiscal incidence; social policy; Latin America;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • H5 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies
    • H51 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - Government Expenditures and Health
    • H52 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - Government Expenditures and Education
    • H53 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - Government Expenditures and Welfare Programs
    • O15 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Economic Development: Human Resources; Human Development; Income Distribution; Migration

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