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Schooling Infrastructure and Female Educational Outcomes in Nepal

Author

Listed:
  • Animesh Giri

    (Cornerstone Research, Washington DC)

  • Vinish Shrestha

    (Department of Economics, Towson University)

Abstract

We estimate the impact of increases in schools constructed during the late 1980s and early 1990s on educational outcomes in Nepal. We use a difference-in-differences framework by combining the across- district differences in the number of new schools with variation in exposure to these schools created by the virtue of individuals being of school-going-age. Our results indicate that an additional school constructed (per 1,000 kilometer square) increased the probability to read and write among females by 1.5 percentage points and increased the highest level of schooling attained by 0.12 units but did not affect basic literacy skills among males. Back-of-the-envelope calculations suggest that on average the increase in the number of schools can explain about a fourth of the total differences in the reading and writing outcomes between the treated and control groups of women. These results underscore the continued importance of increasing access to schooling in developing countries like Nepal.

Suggested Citation

  • Animesh Giri & Vinish Shrestha, 2016. "Schooling Infrastructure and Female Educational Outcomes in Nepal," Working Papers 2016-18, Towson University, Department of Economics, revised Oct 2016.
  • Handle: RePEc:tow:wpaper:2016-18
    as

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    File URL: http://webapps.towson.edu/cbe/economics/workingpapers/2016-18.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    School construction; access to education; female education; female literacy.;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • I2 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education
    • O1 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development
    • H52 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - Government Expenditures and Education

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