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Fairness, Public Good, and Emotional Aspects of Punishment Behavior

Author

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  • Abbink, K.
  • Sadrieh, A.

    (Tilburg University, Center For Economic Research)

  • Zamir, S.

Abstract

We report an experiment on two treatments of an ultimatum minigame. In one treatment, responders’ reactions are hidden to proposers. We observe high rejection rates reflecting responders’ intrinsic resistance to unfairness. In the second treatment, proposers are informed, allowing for dynamic effects over eight rounds of play. The higher rejection rates can be attributed to responders’ provision of a public good: Punishment creates a group reputation for being “toughâ€\x9D and effectively “educateâ€\x9D proposers. Since rejection rates with informed proposers drop to the level of the treatment with non-informed proposers, the hypothesis of responder’s enjoyment of overt punishment is not supported. Copyright Kluwer Academic Publishers 2004
(This abstract was borrowed from another version of this item.)

Suggested Citation

  • Abbink, K. & Sadrieh, A. & Zamir, S., 2002. "Fairness, Public Good, and Emotional Aspects of Punishment Behavior," Discussion Paper 2002-38, Tilburg University, Center for Economic Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:tiu:tiucen:e0955204-a76f-415b-9fdb-40197d5e8570
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    Cited by:

    1. Ralph-C. Bayer & Hang Wu, 2013. "Do We Learn from Our Own Experience or from Observing Others?," School of Economics Working Papers 2013-21, University of Adelaide, School of Economics.
    2. Bryan K. Church & Xi (Jason) Kuang, 2009. "Conflicts of Interest, Disclosure, and (Costly) Sanctions: Experimental Evidence," The Journal of Legal Studies, University of Chicago Press, vol. 38(2), pages 505-532, June.
    3. Andersson, Ola & Galizzi, Matteo M. & Hoppe, Tim & Kranz, Sebastian & der Wiel, Karen van & Wengström, Erik, 2010. "Persuasion in experimental ultimatum games," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 108(1), pages 16-18, July.
    4. Vyrastekova, Jana & Funaki, Yukihiko & Takeuchi, Ai, 2011. "Sanctioning as a social norm: Expectations of non-strategic sanctioning in a public goods game experiment," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 40(6), pages 919-928.
    5. Desai, Raj M. & Olofsgård, Anders, 2019. "Can the poor organize? Public goods and self-help groups in rural India," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 121(C), pages 33-52.
    6. Vyrastekova, J. & Funaki, Y. & Takeuchi, A., 2008. "Strategic vs Non-Strategic Motivations of Sanctioning," Other publications TiSEM 67fd8019-de64-4c57-9af3-8, Tilburg University, School of Economics and Management.
    7. Bruttel, Lisa V., 2009. "Group dynamics in experimental studies--The Bertrand Paradox revisited," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 69(1), pages 51-63, January.
    8. Armantier, Olivier, 2004. "Does observation influence learning?," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 46(2), pages 221-239, February.
    9. Vyrastekova, J. & Funaki, Y. & Takeuchi, A., 2008. "Strategic vs Non-Strategic Motivations of Sanctioning," Discussion Paper 2008-48, Tilburg University, Center for Economic Research.
    10. Sadrieh, Abdolkarim & Verbon, Harrie A.A., 2006. "Inequality, cooperation, and growth: An experimental study," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 50(5), pages 1197-1222, July.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    game theory; public goods; bargaining; punishment; experimental economics;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • C78 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Game Theory and Bargaining Theory - - - Bargaining Theory; Matching Theory
    • C91 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Design of Experiments - - - Laboratory, Individual Behavior
    • C92 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Design of Experiments - - - Laboratory, Group Behavior
    • D82 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Asymmetric and Private Information; Mechanism Design

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