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Market Entries and Exits and the Nonlinear Behaviour of the Exchange Rate Pass-Through into Import Prices

  • Herger Nils

    ()

    (Study Center Gerzensee)

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    This paper develops an empirical framework giving rise to a nonlinear behaviour of the exchange rate pass-through (ERPT). Rather than shifts between low and high infl ation, the nonlinearity arises when large swings in the exchange rate trigger market entries and exits of importing firms. Switching regressions are used to distinguish between low and high pass-through regimes of the exchange rate into import prices. For the case of Switzerland, the corresponding results suggest that, though infl ation has been low and stable, the ERPT still doubles in value in times of a rapid appreciation of the Swiss Franc.

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    File URL: http://www.szgerzensee.ch/fileadmin/Dateien_Anwender/Dokumente/working_papers/wp-1308.pdf
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    Paper provided by Swiss National Bank, Study Center Gerzensee in its series Working Papers with number 13.08.

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    Length: 20 pages
    Date of creation: Aug 2013
    Date of revision:
    Handle: RePEc:szg:worpap:1308
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    1. Frankel, Jeffrey A. & Wei, Shang-jin & Parsley, David, 2012. "Slow Pass-through Around the World: A New Import for Developing Countries?," Scholarly Articles 10494212, Harvard Kennedy School of Government.
    2. Pinelopi Koujianou Goldberg & Michael M. Knetter, 1997. "Goods Prices and Exchange Rates: What Have We Learned?," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 35(3), pages 1243-1272, September.
    3. Bergin, Paul R. & Feenstra, Robert C., 2001. "Pricing-to-market, staggered contracts, and real exchange rate persistence," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 54(2), pages 333-359, August.
    4. Christopher Gust & Sylvain Leduc & Robert Vigfusson, 2006. "Trade Integration, Competiton, and the Decline in Exchange-rate Pass-through," 2006 Meeting Papers 165, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    5. Lian An & Jian Wang, 2011. "Exchange rate pass-through: evidence based on vector autoregression with sign restrictions," Globalization and Monetary Policy Institute Working Paper 70, Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas.
    6. Mototsugu Shintani & Akiko Terada-Hagiwara & Tomoyoshi Yabu, 2009. "Exchange Rate Pass-Through and Inflation: A Nonlinear Time Series Analysis," Vanderbilt University Department of Economics Working Papers 0920, Vanderbilt University Department of Economics.
    7. Nils Herger, 2012. "Exchange Rates and Import Prices in Switzerland," Swiss Journal of Economics and Statistics (SJES), Swiss Society of Economics and Statistics (SSES), vol. 148(III), pages 381-407, September.
    8. José Manuel Campa & Linda S. Goldberg, 2005. "Exchange Rate Pass-Through into Import Prices," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 87(4), pages 679-690, November.
    9. Bernhofen, Daniel M. & Xu, Peng, 2000. "Exchange rates and market power: evidence from the petrochemical industry," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 52(2), pages 283-297, December.
    10. Dornbusch, Rudiger, 1987. "Exchange Rates and Prices," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 77(1), pages 93-106, March.
    11. Kolver Hernandez & Aslı Leblebicioğlu, 2012. "A regime-switching analysis of pass-through," Review of World Economics (Weltwirtschaftliches Archiv), Springer, vol. 148(3), pages 523-552, September.
    12. Ceglowski, Janet, 2010. "Exchange rate pass-through to bilateral import prices," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 29(8), pages 1637-1651, December.
    13. Bergin, Paul R. & Feenstra, Robert C., 2000. "Staggered price setting, translog preferences, and endogenous persistence," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 45(3), pages 657-680, June.
    14. Dixit, Avinash K, 1989. "Hysteresis, Import Penetration, and Exchange Rate Pass-Through," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 104(2), pages 205-28, May.
    15. Jonas Stulz, 2007. "Exchange rate pass-through in Switzerland: Evidence from vector autoregressions," Economic Studies 2007-04, Swiss National Bank.
    16. Devereux, Michael B. & Yetman, James, 2010. "Price adjustment and exchange rate pass-through," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 29(1), pages 181-200, February.
    17. Al-Abri, Almukhtar S. & Goodwin, Barry K., 2009. "Re-examining the exchange rate pass-through into import prices using non-linear estimation techniques: Threshold cointegration," International Review of Economics & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 18(1), pages 142-161, January.
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