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Does Parent or Child Know Best? an Assessment of Parent/Child Agreement in the Canadian National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth

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  • Curtis, Laurie
  • Dooley , Martin
  • Phipps , Shelley

Abstract

We use data from the Canadian National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth to address two questions. To what extent do parents and children agree when asked identical questions about child well-being? To what extent do differences in their responses affect what one infers from multivariate analysis of the data? The correspondence between parent and child in the assessment of child well-being is only slight to fair. Agreement is stronger for more observable outcomes, such as schooling performance, and weaker for less observable outcomes, such as emotional disorders. We regress both sets of responses on a standard set of socio-economic characteristics. We also conduct formal and informal tests of the differences in what one would infer from these two sets of regressions.

Suggested Citation

  • Curtis, Laurie & Dooley , Martin & Phipps , Shelley, 2002. "Does Parent or Child Know Best? an Assessment of Parent/Child Agreement in the Canadian National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth," Analytical Studies Branch Research Paper Series 2002181e, Statistics Canada, Analytical Studies Branch.
  • Handle: RePEc:stc:stcp3e:2002181e
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    File URL: http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/olc-cel/olc.action?ObjId=11F0019M2002181&ObjType=46&lang=en&limit=0
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Deirdre N. McCloskey & Stephen T. Ziliak, 1996. "The Standard Error of Regressions," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 34(1), pages 97-114, March.
    2. Phipps, S., 1999. "The Well-Being of Young Canadian Children in International Perspective," Department of Economics at Dalhousie University working papers archive 99-01, Dalhousie, Department of Economics.
    3. JoAnn Kingston-Riechers, 1998. "The Association Between the Frequency of Wife Assault and Marital Dissolution," Department of Economics Working Papers 1998-05, McMaster University.
    4. Korenman, Sanders & Miller, Jane E. & Sjaastad, John E., 1995. "Long-term poverty and child development in the United States: Results from the NLSY," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 17(1-2), pages 127-155.
    5. Laura Argys & H. Peters & Jeanne Brooks-Gunn & Judith Smith, 1998. "The impact of child support on cognitive outcomes of young children," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 35(2), pages 159-173, May.
    6. David M. Blau, 1999. "The Effect Of Income On Child Development," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 81(2), pages 261-276, May.
    7. Blau, Francine D & Grossberg, Adam J, 1992. "Maternal Labor Supply and Children's Cognitive Development," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 74(3), pages 474-481, August.
    8. P Grootendorst & D Feeny & W Furlong, 1994. "Does It Matter Whom and How You Ask? Inter and Intra-rater Agreement in the Ontario Health Survey," Centre for Health Economics and Policy Analysis Working Paper Series 1994-12, Centre for Health Economics and Policy Analysis (CHEPA), McMaster University, Hamilton, Canada.
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    Cited by:

    1. Lethbridge, Lynn & Phipps , Shelley, 2006. "Income and the Outcomes of Children," Analytical Studies Branch Research Paper Series 2006281e, Statistics Canada, Analytical Studies Branch.

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