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Unemployment in the Stock and Flow

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  • Heisz, Andrew
  • Baker, Michael
  • Corak, Miles

Abstract

A framework for the dynamic analysis of unemployment is presented, and applied to Canadian and U.S. data. The focus of the analysis is upon the distinctionbetween being unemployed and becoming unemployed, that is, between the stock and the flow of unemployment. The share of a particular group in the stock ofunemployed will differ from its share in the flow into unemployment to the extent that the average duration of unemployment for the group differs from the economywide average. An analysis of Canadian and U.S. data leads to a series of stylized facts that permit a deeper understanding of unemployment in the two countries, andof the differences between them. Significant differences in the average duration of unemployment imply that stock shares are not good indicators of flow shares,changes in the stock share of some groups are due to changes in the flow share, while for others they are due to changes in the length of unemployment spells.Explanations of the Canada - U.S. unemployment rate gap should try to accommodate at least three facts uncovered by the analysis: (1) that employer initiatedpermanent separations are the primary means of entry into unemployment in Canada, while labour force entry plays a more important role in the US; (2)unemployment spells are significantly longer in Canada than in the U.S. because of longer spells for most groups regardless of reason for unemployment, not becauseof a compositional difference in the make up of the unemployed; and (3) that longer spell duration and a higher incidence of unemployment contribute about equallyto the trend increase in the Canada - U.S. unemployment differential during the 1980s.

Suggested Citation

  • Heisz, Andrew & Baker, Michael & Corak, Miles, 1996. "Unemployment in the Stock and Flow," Analytical Studies Branch Research Paper Series 1997097e, Statistics Canada, Analytical Studies Branch.
  • Handle: RePEc:stc:stcp3e:1997097e
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    File URL: https://www150.statcan.gc.ca/n1/en/catalogue/11F0019M1997097
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Cédric Tille, 1998. "Decomposition of the Unemployment Gap between Canada and the United States: Duration or Incidence?," Canadian Public Policy, University of Toronto Press, vol. 24(s1), pages 90-102, February.

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