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Decomposition of the Unemployment Gap between Canada and the United States: Duration or Incidence?

  • Cédric Tille

This paper examines whether the unemployment gap between Canada and the US arises from longer unemployment spells or a higher risk of experiencing unemployment in Canada, as the former case has stronger policy implications. We find that the Canadian situation is characterized by longer unemployment spells for men, and a higher risk of experiencing unemployment for women. This indicates that the policy against unemployment should be targeted on the long-term unemployed to reduce the future persistence of unemployment, and that further research in the exact causes of the higher duration of unemployment is relevant.

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Article provided by University of Toronto Press in its journal Canadian Public Policy.

Volume (Year): 24 (1998)
Issue (Month): s1 (February)
Pages: 90-102

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Handle: RePEc:cpp:issued:v:24:y:1998:i:s1:p:90-102
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  1. Layard, Richard & Bean, Charles, 1989. " Why Does Unemployment Persist?," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 91(2), pages 371-96.
  2. Olivier J. Blanchard & Lawrence H. Summers, 1986. "Hysteresis and the European Unemployment Problem," Working papers 427, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Department of Economics.
  3. Ljungqvist, Lars & Sargent, Thomas J., 1997. "The European Unemployment Dilemma," SSE/EFI Working Paper Series in Economics and Finance 178, Stockholm School of Economics.
  4. Budd, Alan & Levine, Paul & Smith, Peter, 1988. "Unemployment, Vacancies and the Long-term Unemployed," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 98(393), pages 1071-91, December.
  5. Akerlof, George A & Yellen, Janet L, 1985. "Unemployment through the Filter of Memory," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 100(3), pages 747-73, August.
  6. Lockwood, Ben, 1991. "Information Externalities in the Labour Market and the Duration of Unemployment," Review of Economic Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 58(4), pages 733-53, July.
  7. Heisz, Andrew & Baker, Michael & Corak, Miles, 1996. "Unemployment in the Stock and Flow," Analytical Studies Branch Research Paper Series 1997097e, Statistics Canada, Analytical Studies Branch.
  8. Stephen W. Salant, 1974. "Search theory and duration data: a theory of sorts," Special Studies Papers 42, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
  9. Jackman, Richard & Layard, Richard, 1991. "Does Long-term Unemployment Reduce a Person's Chance of a Job? A Time-Series Test," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 58(229), pages 93-106, February.
  10. Stephen T. Marston, 1976. "Employment Instability and High Unemployment Rates," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 7(1), pages 169-210.
  11. Pissarides, Christopher A, 1992. "Loss of Skill during Unemployment and the Persistence of Employment Shocks," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 107(4), pages 1371-91, November.
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